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Public transport use in Germany goes up 'thanks to €49 ticket'

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DPA/The Local - [email protected]
Public transport use in Germany goes up 'thanks to €49 ticket'
People wait for an U-Bahn train in Munich. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Sven Hoppe

The introduction of the Deutschlandticket contributed to an increase in passenger numbers on buses and trains in the first half of the year, according to Germany’s Statistical Office on Thursday.

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Almost 5.3 billion passengers travelled on public transport in the first half of 2023, an increase of 10 percent from the same period last year. However, that was still 13 percent less than the first six months of 2019.

The Statistical Office attributed the increase to the Deutschlandticket, which was introduced on May 1st, and allows travellers to use all regional and local public transport all around Germany for €49 a month. 

READ ALSO: Demand for Germany's €49 ticket crashes Deutsche Bahn website

So far in the second quarter of the year, the number of passengers has only increased by four percent, according to the Statistical Office.

But that’s due to the fact that the €9 ticket - which offered all the benefits of the €49 - led to a particularly strong increase in passenger numbers in June to August 2022, when it was offered.

Passenger numbers on scheduled long-distance services, which had fallen the most during the Corona crisis, grew particularly strongly in the first half of 2023. Long-distance trains recorded 72 million passengers, 16 percent more than in the same period last year.

Long-distance bus services were used by 4.8 million people - 89 percent more than last year. In local public transport, which accounts for 99 percent of scheduled transport, passenger volume increased by 10 percent.

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Vocabulary

public transport - (der) öffentliche Verkehr 

long distance - (die) Fernstrecke

traveller (on public transport) - (der) Fahrgast

introduced - eingeführt

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