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Job advert: The Local Germany is looking to recruit a new journalist

If you'd be interested in joining our team at The Local to help explain Germany to a growing audience of subscribers then read on.

Aerial view of Berlin from the Berliner Dom cathedral.
Aerial view of Berlin from the Berliner Dom cathedral. Photo: Robert Keane

The Local seeks a reporter in Germany  

The Local is currently seeking a reporter in Berlin to join our growing team of internationally minded, driven and clued-up journalists.  

As a reporter, you will work closely with your country editor to build membership of The Local Germany and reach new audiences.

You will cover the relevant news about Germany as well as explain to our readers how this news affects their lives. You will also write articles to explain the practical info our readers need for living in Germany and write features to help them get to grips with the German language, the people and the culture.

You will seek out the issues and subjects that matter to our readers as foreign residents in Germany and help provide them with answers or explanations.

You will also be part of a vibrant team stretching from Sweden to Spain, working together to grow membership across The Local and increase its profile among an international audience.

The Local currently has over 50,000 members of which around 6,000 are signed up to our German site.

What we expect from you:  

  • An exceptional level of written and spoken English (native speaker or equivalent).  
  • Fluency in German: Our ideal candidate has been living in Germany for more than a year.  
  • The ability to write clear, concise and engaging news stories, explainers and practical features.  
  • The ability to dig out stories that matter to readers and build contacts with groups and associations representing foreign nationals.
  • Experience of translating from German to English and an ability to turn flowing German prose into equally flowing English prose.  
  • At least two years’ experience in an editorial role.  
  • A knowledge of journalistic ethics and good practice.  
  • An excellent knowledge of German society, politics and institutions. 
  • Flexibility: the ability to work some unsocial hours as needed, sometimes at short notice.  
  • Excellent interpersonal skills.  
  • Familiarity with using social media.  
  • Familiarity with blogging, online publishing, sound recording and photo editing are an advantage.  
  • A knowledge of other languages apart from English and German (particularly French, Italian and Spanish) would be useful.  

This is you:  

  • Curiosity: you want to help explain Germany to our readers and dig deep to find out how the country works.
  • Selfless: You want to do what it takes to explore issues our readers are having living in Germany and get the answers they need
  • Imagination: you’re constantly thinking of new ways to approach stories, new ways to use online and social media, new ways to connect with our audiences.  
  • Intelligence: you have a sophisticated approach to news and info that will help The  Local in Germany broaden its readership while retaining loyal existing readers.
  • Diligence: You are prepared to go the extra length to make your articles as valuable as possible

All applicants must have the right to live and work in Germany. The Local cannot sponsor work visa applications.

Making a commitment to our team will give you the chance to pursue an exciting, international journalism career. The job is full time and is permanent (CDI contract). Pay competitive.  

If you think you have what it takes, send your CV and a brief introduction (in English) to [email protected], with the subject line Reporter position, The Local Germany  

The Local is an English-language online news network, with sites in nine countries used by more than 5 million people each month and 50,000 paying members.

With an entertaining blend of daily news, features and practical info, our sites have become  essential reading for foreign citizens.

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MONEY

EXPLAINED: Who will benefit from Germany’s minimum wage hike?

Germany's new €12/hour minimum wage, which came into force on October 1st, is set to benefit more than six million people. We look at exactly who is going to be helped by the €1.55/hour increase.

EXPLAINED: Who will benefit from Germany's minimum wage hike?

How much has the minimum wage risen by?
As of October 1st, the minimum wage now stands at €12 per hour, up from €10.45 previously, i.e. an increase of almost 15 percent.

How many people are going to benefit from the increase?
According to the Hans Böckler Foundation’ Institute of Economic and Social Research (WSI), a trade union-linked research foundation, there are at least 6.64 million people who were earning less than €12 per hour before the increase. This includes 3.5 million women and 2.7 million men.

Will this mainly benefit people in full- or part-time work?
If we look at the number of hours worked, we can see the following picture: 1.4 million full-time employees will get a boost to their earnings, and 1.8 million part-time staff and three million people with so-called ‘mini-jobs’ will earn more per hour. A mini-job is where you can either earn a maximum monthly sum or work for no more than three months/70 days per year. Those who only have a mini-job don’t have to pay social security contributions.

The upper earnings limit for people with mini-jobs also rose on October 1st. People can now earn a maximum of €520 per month, up from €450/month previously. 

READ ALSO: The rules in Germany around mini and midi jobs

Does the increase have anything to do with the current energy crisis?
No. The coalition government had already planned this before Russia invaded Ukraine and the resulting energy crisis. After the Bundestag (lower house of parliament) passed the draft law on June 3, 2022, it was confirmed by the Bundesrat (upper house) on June 10 where concerns about the cost-of-living crisis played a key role in the final debate. At that time, several politicians warned that spiralling energy prices and inflation were making many people’s living situations untenable. The government has since introduced other initiatives to help people cope.

READ ALSO: Wohngeld: How people in Germany can get help with rising living costs

In which sectors will the increase have the biggest impact?
More than 60 percent of people working in the hospitality sector will be affected by the increase. According to government data, 46 percent of those working in the agricultural and forestry sector were earning below €12/hour. Thirty-two percent of those in the property sector and 29 percent in the transport and warehousing sector also earned less than the minimum wage.

What are trade unions and employers’ associations saying about the hike?
The German Trade Union Confederation (DGB) has been pushing for an increase for a long time. DGB head Stefan Koerzell recently called the step “a ray of hope in these difficult times”. But the Confederation of German Employers’ Associations’ BDA called Labour and Social Affairs Minister Hubertus Heil’s draft law for the increase of the minimum wage “extremely questionable” from a political and legal perspective. The BDA’s criticism was not targeted at the increase itself, but rather the fact that it was the legislator who was deciding on wage increases instead of employers and trade unions.

What role do trade unions and employers’ associations play when it comes to the minimum wage?
Normally a big one – they sit on the minimum wage board. This committee normally proposes the incremental increases for the base hourly salary, which was introduced in 2015 – it then stood at €8.50. The new legal increase to €12 is outside of this usual mechanism, but the coalition government has promised that after this, the minimum wage commission will be responsible for future increases once again. 

READ ALSO: Everything that changes in Germany in October 2022

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