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OPERA

Renowned German opera director Harry Kupfer dead at 84

One of the world's most celebrated opera directors, Germany's Harry Kupfer, has died at the age of 84 in Berlin, his agency confirmed on Tuesday.

Renowned German opera director Harry Kupfer dead at 84
Harry Kupfer died at home on December 30 after a long illness. Photo: picture alliance/Sören Stache/dpa
In a career spanning 44 years, Kupfer worked at opera houses across Germany and was chief director of Berlin's iconic Komische Oper for more than two decades.
   
Born in 1935, Kupfer studied in Leipzig and first worked in then-communist East Germany. But he rose to fame in 1978 with a production of Richard Wagner's “The Flying Dutchman” at the world-renowned Bayreuth festival.
   
He took the reins at the Komische Oper three years later in 1981.
   
A student of Komische Oper founder Walter Felsenstein, Kupfer staged works by Mozart and Wagner and oversaw two world premieres at the opera house before bowing out in 2002.
   
He returned to Bayreuth in 1988, staging Wagner's “Ring of the Nibelung” alongside Argentine-Israeli conductor Daniel Barenboim.
   
After the fall of the Berlin Wall, Kupfer cooperated with Barenboim again on an ambitious project to stage one Wagner opera a year over the course of a decade at the Berlin State Opera.
   
He continued to work until right up to his death, directing around the world and staging Georg Friederich Handel's Poro in a triumphant return to the Komische Oper earlier this year.

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OPERA

‘A day without music is a wasted day’: German opera star Peter Schreier dies at 84

German singer and conductor Peter Schreier, widely regarded as one of the leading lyric tenors of the 20th century, died on Thursday at the age of 84 after a long illness, his secretary said.

'A day without music is a wasted day': German opera star Peter Schreier dies at 84
Schreier in Leipzig in 2013. Photo: DPA

Schreier, one of the few international stars to emerge from former communist East Germany, passed away in his beloved home city of Dresden.

Although Schreier retired from opera at the age of 65 in 2000 because he felt too old to be playing young lovers on stage, he continued to give “Lieder” or song recitals for a few more years and then focused on teaching and conducting until his health problems became too severe.

Schreier suffered from back and hip problems and had diabetes, according to German media.

In a career that spanned decades and encompassed more than 60 different roles, Schreier performed regularly in some of the world's most prestigious opera houses and festivals, from Berlin, Vienna and Salzburg to New York and Milan.

He was perhaps most famous for his interpretations of Bach and Mozart, but his repertoire also included Wagner and he even sang at the legendary Bayreuth Festival in 1966.

“A day without music is a wasted day,” DPA news agency quoted him as saying.

Schreier (middle) being honoured with a Bach medal in 2013. Photo: DPA

Born on July 29, 1935 in the small town of Gauernitz near Dresden in Saxony state, Schreier's singing talent soon became apparent to his father, a church cantor.

At the age of eight, Schreier joined Dresden's famous Kreuzchor boys' choir and went on to study singing and conducting in the city which was heavily destroyed by Allied bombing during World War II.

Mozart breakthrough

Schreier made his operatic debut in the role of First Prisoner in Beethoven's “Fidelio” at the Dresden State Opera.

But his breakthrough came a little later in two key Mozart roles — Belmonte in “The Abduction from the Seraglio” and Tamino in “The Magic Flute”.

While critics did not always describe his voice as beautiful, they praised the intensity and intelligence of his performances.

A pivotal member of the Berlin State Opera at Unter den Linden in then East Berlin, Schreier enjoyed rare privileges in the tightly-controlled GDR — without being a member of the ruling SED communist party.

In 1972, he took up the baton and went on to conduct some of the world's leading orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic and the Vienna Philharmonic.

But Schreier always insisted his heart belonged to Dresden.

“I would be missing something if I couldn't live in Dresden,” he used to
say.

He finally took his leave from the concert stage in 2005 at a performance of Bach's Christmas Oratorio in Prague, when he both conducted and also sang the role of the Evangelist.

That same year, he told German media he was looking forward to relaxing at his countryside villa on the outskirts of Dresden and cooking for his wife Renate.

“I've really sung enough and would just like to enjoy a few more peaceful years now,” he said.

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