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Germany could be one step closer to permanent summer time after EU vote

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Germany could be one step closer to permanent summer time after EU vote
Photo: DPA
17:14 CET+01:00
Lawmakers in the European parliament voted on Tuesday to end the traditional changing of the clocks in spring and autumn from 2021. That means Germany could be heading for permanent summer time.
MEPs voted 410 to 192 in favour of ending the practice of changing the clocks forward in spring and back in autumn from 2021.

However, the parliament said it should be up to each individual member state to decide whether to stick to summer time or winter time in future.

According to the legislation passed by parliament the EU member states that decide to stay on summer time will put their clocks forward for a final time in March 2021.

SEE ALSO: Everything that changes in Germany in March 2019

And those countries that prefer to stay on winter time will put their clocks back for the final time in Autumn 2021.

The bill is now the official position of the EU parliament, however it will be up to the European Council to make a final decision on whether the clocks stop in future.

The council - which is made up by the leaders of each member state - will have to vote unanimously for the change, but may be swayed by the fact the move would be popular among Europeans.

In a Europe-wide survey last year some 80 percent of Europeans voted in favour of stopping the clock changes, with most people appearing to prefer to stay on summer time rather than winter time.

As reported by The Local, in total, 4.6 million respondents took part in the survey, of which three million were based in Germany.
 
"The changing of the clocks will be scrapped," European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker said last year adding that the idea would be to keep the whole of Europe on "summer time" all year-round.
 
"The people want it, so we will do it." 

Initially introduced to save energy, the change of time in summer and winter in the EU - in force in France since 1976 - has been strongly opposed for years. Critics cite negative effects on sleep and health or road accidents, as well as the lack of real energy savings.

The clocks go forward at 2am on Sunday March 31st. 

 

 
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