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LEARNING GERMAN

German Word of the Day: Schwarzfahren

The next time you hop on a tram without buying a ticket, you could be found guilty of fare-dodging, or 'riding black'.

German Word of the Day: Schwarzfahren
Photo: Depositphotos

Schwarzfahren is a compound noun literally meaning 'black-riding', but translates as 'fare dodging'. You can get accused of Schwarzfahren either if you use public transport without a valid ticket or drive a car without a valid driver's license.

In Germany, unlike most other European countries, public transport does not have barriers or turnstiles so it is easy to get on the U-Bahn without a ticket. However, if you decide to fare dodge, you run the risk of being caught by ticket inspectors, and the fines are hefty. 

Always remember to validate your ticket before you get on a train or tram, because fines for first-time offenders in Germany are normally around €60.

Berlin U-Bahn, U5 line. Photo: DPA

 

 

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GERMAN WORD OF THE DAY

German word of the day: Kneipe

This is a spot you might visit at the end of the working day - or Feierabend.

German word of the day: Kneipe

Why do I need to know Kneipe?

Because you may be invited to one or need to find one on the map. 

What does it mean?

Die Kniepe, which sounds like this, is the name for a pub in German where people gather to drink beverages. This isn’t a fancy cocktail bar – it’s a neighbourhood watering hole, and forms part of the make-up of towns and cities across Germany. It’s usually unpretentious, often small and in some places – like Berlin – it can be smoky. In that case, you might see a a Raucherkneipe (smoking pub) sign on the door or window. 

The word has been around since the 18th century and is an abbreviation of Kneipschenke. A Kneipschenke was a super-cramped premise where guests had to pack in and sit squeezed together.

The noun Schenke is a tavern, while Kneipe is said to come from the verb kneipen meaning “to press together” or “be close together”, which has been documented in Middle German and is a loanword from the Middle Low German word knīpen. That word is related to High German’s kneifen, which means “to pinch”. 

Kneipen don’t always have the best reputation. You might also get some suspicious looks if you crash a very local Kneipe that is used to only serving regulars or Stammgäste. But they are usually friendly and charming, and give an insight into life in Germany. So perhaps ask your German friends for a tip on a cool Kneipe to visit. Just don’t expect the staff to speak English like you usually find in hipster bars! 

If you’re hungry, keep in mind that Kneipen usually don’t serve food. Pubs that do serve hot food are more likely to be called a Wirtschaft or Lokal.

You can also do a pub crawl (eine Kneipentour machen) if you can handle the amount of booze (or switch to non-alcoholic drinks). 

How to use it:

Treffen wir uns am Freitag nach Feierabend in der Kneipe.

Let’s meet in the pub on Friday after work finishes.

Ich gehe mit den Jungs in die Kneipe.

I’m going to the pub with the lads.

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