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Saarmojis: Saarland the ‘first German state with its own emojis'

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Saarmojis: Saarland the ‘first German state with its own emojis'
"From Saarland or famous?" Image: Saarmojis/DPA
10:19 CET+01:00
Saarland unveiled some 400 of its own emojis, so-called ‘Saarmojis,' on Tuesday in Saarbrücken.

Locals in the mini state no longer have to rely on the international range of emojis to express their feelings online, reported the Saarbrücker Zeitung. That's because on Tuesday, the Saarmoji app was launched.

Saarland is the first federal state in Germany with its own emojis, said Zymryte Hoxhaj, the designer who came up with the idea and headed the project.

Emojis are small digital images used to express emotions or ideas digitally, often used in SMS or Whataspp messages on smartphones.

Image: Saarmojis/DPA

Among the range of emojis Hoxhaj designed, which spans twelve different categories including food and drink, sports, sayings, business and tourism, there's also one of a Lyoner sausage - the state's most popular dish. Another Saarmoji is an image of a Schwenker grill, which is a special type of grill to roast pork that's native to Saarland.

"There's the right one for every mood," said Hoxhaj.

Further emojis include typical expressions that locals say such as "Hauptsach gudd gess!" or "Ei joo".

“We Saarlanders are very attached to our homeland and are proud of its special features. It's high time that this also made its way into digital communication," the designer added.

The Saarmoji app was developed by the Saarland-based creative agency Bureau Stabil with financial support from the Ministry of Economics and Education.

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