Rare silver treasures from Viking Age discovered on North Sea island

DPA/The Local
DPA/The Local - [email protected] • 25 Sep, 2017 Updated Mon 25 Sep 2017 16:16 CEST
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Archaeologists presented the findings - including a ring brooch - discovered on the north German island of Sylt to the public on Monday.

“This is one of the largest ever silver treasure troves from Schleswig-Holstein," said Claus von Carnap-Bornheim, head of the state’s archaeological office.

In the summer, experts dug up a total of 180 pieces of silver jewellery on Sylt with a total weight of about one kilogram. The pieces included preserved pieces of jewellery such as bracelets, finger rings and a neck ring. Coins and ingots were also found.

View of Sylt from above. Photo: DPA.

Decades ago, a farmer had found a ring brooch made of silver on a field in Sylt. In 2015, the farmer’s family bequeathed the piece of jewellery to their family doctor, who then gave it to local archaeologists.

After determining the area where the find had been discovered, the archaeologists in Schleswig-Holstein started digging.

Among their findings is the needle that matches the ring brooch which initially belonged to the farmer. Experts date it back to the middle of the tenth century. In future, the find will be showcased in the permanent exhibition at the State Archaeological Museum in the city of Schleswig.

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