• Germany's news in English
 
app_header_v3

Merkel: relations with US not 'one-way street'

The Local · 25 Oct 2013, 16:23

Published: 25 Oct 2013 16:23 GMT+02:00

She made the comments following a meeting of the European Commission in Brussels.

Merkel said EU member states had agreed on the importance of co-operation between US and European intelligence services in ensuring the safety of citizens. However she added that "rather than making co-operation easier, mistrust makes it more difficult."

She also announced that Germany and France intended to redefine their security co-operation with the US by the end of this year.

However the chancellor deflected questions about her telephone conversation with US President Barack Obama, by stressing: "The American president is always well prepared and we are united by a now long-standing relationship, which includes occasional differences of opinion."

Merkel's comments follow the revelation on Friday that the tapping of her phone may have been directed a few hundred metres away from the seat of the German government at the US embassy in Berlin.

The Süddeutsche Zeitung claimed Merkel’s phone tapping was possibly being conducted from a listening station which was part of the Special Collection Service (SCS) – an eavesdropping programme run by the CIA and NSA at the US embassy on Pariser Platz.

The embassy is around 500 metres from the German parliament and government buildings including her office, the Kanzleramt.

It said the suspicions arose from documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden, a former NSA contractor - who leaked documents exposing a mass surveillance programme by the NSA.

When asked by The Local, the embassy declined to comment.

On Friday Germany and France called on Washington to agree on rules in the spy game after revelations the US tapped German Chancellor Angela Merkel's mobile phone.

The call was made at a European Union summit in Brussels where leaders were supposed to be discussing economics and immigration until it emerged on Wednesday night that the US National Security Agency (NSA) had likely spied on Merkel's phone.

Leaders "took note of the intention of France and Germany to seek bilateral talks with the US", EU President Herman Van Rompuy told a press conference after a first day of summit talks wrapped up.

Van Rompuy said other countries could join Berlin and Paris should they wish in seeking this trust-based "understanding" with the United States "before the end of the year" in the field of intelligence gathering.

In a statement in the early hours of Friday morning, the leaders of the 28-state EU "underlined the close relationship between Europe and the USA and the value of

that partnership."

They "expressed their conviction that the partnership must be based on respect and trust, including as concerns the work and cooperation of secret services."

Merkel had arrived at the two-day talks saying: "Spying between friends, that's just not done" after reports the US National Security Agency had eavesdropped her calls.

"We need trust between partners and such trust needs to be re-established," she said.

The story is unlikely to go away any time soon, with Britain's Guardian saying Washington had listened in on the phone conversations of 35 world leaders.

Meanwhile, an advisor to President Obama acknowledged that US surveillance

had created "significant" challenges with its allies.

"Though we collect the same sort of intelligence as all nations, our intelligence community has more restrictions and oversight than in any other country in history," Lisa Monaco, assistant to the president on homeland security and counterterrorism, wrote in an opinion article in American newspaper USA Today.

Recent disclosures "have created significant challenges in our relationships with some of our closest foreign partners," Monaco said.

Monaco added that "the president has directed us to review our surveillance capabilities, including with respect to our foreign partners."

In Washington earlier, White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters: "We are not going to comment publicly on every specified alleged intelligence activity," noting that all nations spy on each other.

Hollande and Merkel called Obama earlier this week demanding clarification of claims the NSA had spied on millions of French phone calls and on the German leader personally.

The French president said there had to be a code of conduct put in place, recalling that the EU had set up a special unit to review the issue after leaks by fugitive former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden earlier this year.

Story continues below…

These experts have to "accelerate their work with our American allies", Hollande said, because "this is a subject which is not going away."

"We need to get results," he said, adding that in the end, Snowden's revelations may prove useful.

White House spokesman Jay Carney refused to say whether Washington was at fault.

"We are not going to comment publicly on every specified alleged intelligence activity," Carney said, noting too that all nations spy on each other.

Friday's summit is supposed to tackle an immigration crisis highlighted by the deaths of hundreds of desperate refugees trying to reach Europe's shores but the spying scandal could easily take the headlines again as more revelations come through.

READ MORE: Germany believes US National Security Agency tapped Merkel's phone

AFP/kkf

Follow us on Twitter @thelocalgermany

Like The Local Germany on Facebook

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

Today's headlines
VW to pay US suppliers $1.2 bln over Dieselgate
Volkswagen model vehicles on a dealer lot in Bedford, Massachusetts, USA. Photo: Cj Gunther/Picture Alliance/DPA

German auto giant Volkswagen has agreed to pay US suppliers $1.2 billion to settle claims emanating from the "Dieselgate" pollution scandal, the firm and suppliers said late Friday.

This Week in History
75 years since one of Holocaust's worst massacres
Photo: DPA

On Thursday, German president Joachim Gauck spoke in Kiev 75 years after the Nazis slaughtered 33,771 Jews during one of the worst single massacres of the Holocaust.

Six things you need to know about troubled Deutsche Bank

Shares in Deutsche bank plunged on Friday morning, dragging down other European banks and markets worldwide. Here are six things to know about Germany's biggest lender.

Deutsche Bahn jacks up prices for first time in 3 years
Photo: DPA

Germany's main rail provider, the state-owned Deutsche Bahn (DB), announced on Friday that it will raise prices on long-distance train travel.

Baby found alive in suitcase with skeleton in Hanover
File photo: DPA.

A baby has been found alive, along with the skeleton of another infant inside of a suitcase in Hanover, police reported on Friday.

Morocco to speed up repatriation of illegal migrants
Photo: DPA

Morocco has agreed to streamline the procedures for the repatriation of citizens living illegally in Germany, the royal court said late on Thursday.

890,000 refugees arrived in Germany last year - not 1.1m
Photo: DPA

Previous reports had suggested that around 1.1 million people entered Germany to seek asylum last year. But now the German government has confirmed the number was actually lower.

Racist attacks cast cloud over Dresden Unity Day planning
A police vehicle in Dresden. Photo: DPA.

As Dresden prepares to host Germany’s national Unity Day celebrations on Monday, the capital of the eastern state of Saxony is upping security after a mosque was targeted by a homemade bomb.

Sinking Deutsche Bank stock sends shock across Europe
Photo: DPA

Shares in Germany's biggest lender Deutsche Bank plummeted on the Frankfurt stock market on Friday, dragging other European banks and global markets down with it, after reports some customers were pulling money out.

The Local List
10 things you never knew about German reunification
Reunification celebrations in Hanover in 2014. Photo: DPA

With German Unity Day (October 3rd) happening on Monday, Germans are looking forward to a three-day weekend. But did you know these facts about reunification and German Unity Day?

Sponsored Article
The Inner Circle: the secret to dating in Berlin
Germany's 10 most Instagram-able places
Sponsored Article
Why Jordan is the ‘Different’ East
Lifestyle
15 pics that prove Germany is absolutely enchanting in autumn
Lifestyle
10 German films you have to watch before you die
Lifestyle
6 things about Munich that’ll stay with you forever
Sponsored Article
Retiring abroad: ensuring your health is covered
Lifestyle
10 pieces of German slang you'll never learn in class
National
Seven great reasons to stay in Germany this September
National
Ouch! Naked swimmer hospitalized after angler hooks his penis
National
Six reasons why Berlin is now known as 'the failed city'
Sponsored Article
Life in Jordan: 'Undiscovered treasure'
National
15 tell-tale signs you’ll never quite master German
Culture
7 American habits that make Germans very, very uncomfortable
Sponsored Article
The Inner Circle: the secret to dating in Berlin
Rhineland
Story of a fugitive cow who outwitted police for weeks before capture
Culture
Eleven famous Germans with surnames that'll make your sides split
Lifestyle
The best ways to get a visa as an American in Germany
Gallery
Germany's 17 Olympic gold medals in pictures
14 facts you never knew about the Brandenburg Gate
Society
Ten times Germans proved they really, really love beer
National
Six things you need to know when moving to Germany
Travel
These 10 little-known German towns are a must see
International
German scientists prove birds can sleep while flying
Technology
London v. Berlin: Which is better for startups?
Lifestyle
13 mortifying mistakes German learners always make
6,789
jobs available
Toytown Germany
Germany's English-speaking crowd