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INTERNET

Germans not fussed by TV on smartphones

For many, watching television is all about the size of the screen and the sharpest image rather than mobile access. Only one in four Germans told a poll released on Thursday they want TV channels on their smartphone.

Germans not fussed by TV on smartphones
Photo: DPA

Mobile phone television has been thrown around as the ‘next big thing’ for a while, but as smart phones gain in popularity in Germany there seems to still be little interest in tiny, portable telly.

Just 23 percent told pollsters YouGov that they would watch TV on their phone. Half of these said that it was out of fear of taking up too much of their data plan and costing too much money.

Even if a phone were to be connected to WiFi, and thus the user be freed of worrying about using up data, only 30 percent – seven percent more – said they would use it.

For the poll, YouTube asked 1,575 Germans between January and February

DPA/The Local/jcw

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INTERNET

Ten German abbreviations that will have you texting like a true native

The modern, simple syntax of text speak is a ‘Handy’ method of communication to cut down time on the complexities of language and to impress your native German friends.

Ten German abbreviations that will have you texting like a true native
Photo: DPA

Notorious for its long compound nouns and complex grammatical system, the German language often receives a bad rap as being difficult to perfect.

However, with the ever-expanding world of social media and smartphones, the language is continually adapting. 

Both Kurzdeutsch (short German) and Netzjargon (internet slang) are on the rise, in line with the ever-expanding, fast-paced world of technology and instant messaging.

READ ALSO: ‘Short German’ text speak spares you from grammar

Our short guide to German text speak will have you chatting online like a local in no time.

Photo: DPA

Bd – Bis dann (‘until then’)

A useful phrase that is an equivalent of ‘see you later’.

kD – kein Ding (‘no problem’) 

Literally meaning ‘no thing’, this phrase can be used when you need to say that something is no bother or no issue.

kA – keine Ahnung (‘no idea’)

An all-important phrase for learners of the tricky German language, kA can stand for ‘keine Ahnung’, or ‘no idea’.

LG – Liebe Grüße (‘Best wishes’ / ‘Kind regards’)

This abbreviation is often used as a sign off at the end of a text message.

vlt/vllt – vielleicht (‘maybe’, ‘possibly’)

A shortened version useful for expressing uncertainty. Germans also use evt or evtl (short for ‘eventuell’) for the same purpose. 

WE – Wochenende (‘weekend’)

This is a helpful phrase to arrange plans or express excitement for that Friday feeling – ‘Wochenende’ is the German word for weekend.

nix – nichts (‘nothing’)

Commonly seen on social media, Germans often shorten the word ‘nichts’ to ‘nix’ online.

Gn8 – Gute Nacht (‘goodnight’)

Perhaps a little outdated now, the German word for the number eight, ‘acht’, can be used in text language to form whole words, similarly to the English use of ‘gr8’.

IRL – im richtigen Leben (‘in real life’)

Equivalent to the English ‘IRL’, this abbreviation is used to denote something in the real world, rather than in the digital one.

hdl – Hab dich lieb (‘love you lots’)

Commonly used among family and close friends, this initialism is used to express love. For a romantic partner, you might see ild (‘Ich liebe dich’ – I love you).

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