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CRIME

Man ‘paid €1,000 to have girlfriend killed’

A man who planned to use his girlfriend’s life insurance to start up a riding school, paid another man €1,000 to kill her – using a love-struck woman as a go-between to arrange the murder, German police said on Friday.

Man 'paid €1,000 to have girlfriend killed'
Photo: DPA

“This was a most perfidious, planned killing in middle-class, well-off circles,” said public prosecutor Michael von Hagen.

He said the 23-year-old man from Berlin, who was initially considered a suspect in the actual killing, had not trusted himself to kill his 21-year-old girlfriend to get his hands on her €245,000 life insurance.

So he asked a 26-year-old woman to help him. She had ideas about being with him, and promised to find a way to remove her younger love rival. Her 23-year-old brother, who was in prison, put her in contact with the alleged contract killer who supposedly demanded just €1,000 for the job.

Jutta Porzucek, head of the murder commission said the woman, her brother and the killer had all confessed – although the boyfriend had not.

“It is shocking to see with what cold-bloodedness the boyfriend, with his 23 years, went about things that day.” She said even experienced detectives were shocked by the attack.

The man got his girlfriend to accompany him to a car park near the Lübars swimming pool in northern Berlin. Although he had told her it was to meet someone to talk about buying a horse, she obviously realised something was wrong and brought a friend. This scared off the killer, who ditched the plan.

Shortly afterwards, police said, the man persuaded her to go with him and the 26-year-old other woman to another meeting and persuaded her to get into a car where the killer was waiting. They then watched as he strangled her to death.

Her body was discovered on June 21 near the car park.

DPA/hc

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CRIME

Driver in Bavaria gets €5,000 fine for giving the finger to speed camera

A driver in Passau has been hit with a €5,000 fine because he was caught by traffic police giving the middle finger.

Driver in Bavaria gets €5,000 fine for giving the finger to speed camera

The district court of Passau sentenced the 53-year-old motorist to the fine after he was caught making the rude gesture in the direction of the speedometer last August on the A3 near the Donautal Ost service area, reported German media. 

The man was not caught speeding, however. According to traffic police who were in the speed camera vehicle at the time, another driver who had overtaken the 53-year-old was over the speed limit. 

When analysing the photo, the officers discovered the slower driver’s middle finger gesture and filed a criminal complaint.

The driver initially filed an objection against a penalty order, and the case dragged on for several months. However, he then accepted the complaint. He was sentenced to 50 ‘unit fines’ of €100 on two counts of insulting behaviour, amounting to €5,000.

READ ALSO: The German rules of the road that are hard to get your head around

In a letter to police, the man said he regretted the incident and apologised. 

Police said it was “not a petty offence”, and that the sentence could have been “even more drastic”.

People who give insults while driving can face a prison sentences of up to a year.

“Depending on the nature and manner of the incident or in the case of persons with a previous conviction, even a custodial sentence without parole may be considered for an insult,” police in Passau said. 

What does the law say?

Showing the middle finger to another road user in road traffic is an offence in Germany under Section 185 of the Criminal Code (StGB). It’s punishable by a prison sentence of up to one year or a fine.

People can file a complaint if someone shows them the middle finger in road traffic, but it usually only has a chance of success if witnesses can prove that it happened.

As well as the middle finger, it can also be an offence to verbally insult someone. 

READ ALSO: The German road signs that confuse foreigners

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