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POLITICS

Teen boob job wannabes ‘will have to wait’

German teenagers wanting a boob job, a nose job or liposuction will have to wait until they turn 18, even if their parents will sign off on the surgery, under new government plans.

Teen boob job wannabes 'will have to wait'
Photo: DPA

Piercings and tattoos would still be allowed for minors though, according to a Health Ministry statement quoted by the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ) on Thursday.

Terms describing cosmetic – or plastic – surgery should also be legally defined to prevent confusion and protect patients from unqualified surgeons.

Health Minister Daniel Bahr hopes to include the ban in a revision of patent protection laws – and set up a million-euro fund to compensate patients whose cosmetic surgery has gone wrong.

“Even with a thorough explanation, there is no guarantee that a young person will be able to understand the reach of his or her decision,” the statement said.

Around 10 percent of people who went under the knife in 2004 were under the age of 20, according to the Association of German Plastic Surgeons (VDÄPC).

It remains unclear how many people are dissatisfied with their procedure once they get home and look in the mirror, but more than 14,000 complaints against plastic surgeons were filed in 2010. Of the 7,355 complainants who went to court, 2,157 were awarded compensation.

The compensation fund that the Health Ministry hopes to set up could, according to the FAZ, start off with €2 million, which would come both from private donations from doctors and from public health insurers.

The Local/jcw

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POLITICS

‘A good thing’ for footballers to express values, says France’s PM

France's Prime Minister Elisabeth Borne - speaking in Berlin - said that footballers should be allowed to express their values, amid controversy over FIFA's stance against the 'OneLove' armband on the pitch.

'A good thing' for footballers to express values, says France's PM

“There are rules for what happens on the field but I think it’s a good thing for players to be able to express themselves on the values that we obviously completely share, while respecting the rules of the tournament,” said Borne at a press conference in Berlin on Friday.

Germany’s players made headlines before Wednesday’s shock loss to Japan when the team lined up for their pre-match photo with their hands covering their mouths after FIFA’s threat to sanction players wearing the rainbow-themed armband.

Seven European nations, including Germany, had previously planned for their captains to wear the armband, but backed down over FIFA’s warning.

Following Germany’s action, Wales and the Netherlands have since come out to say they would not mirror the protest.

Borne’s visit to Germany was her first since she was named to her post in May.

Following talks with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, the two leaders signed an agreement for “mutual support” on “guaranteeing their energy supplies”.

Concrete measures outlined in the deal include France sending Germany gas supplies as Berlin seeks to make up for gaping holes in deliveries from Russia.

Germany meanwhile would help France “secure its electricity supplies over winter”, according to the document.

France had since 1981 been a net exporter of electricity to its neighbours because of its nuclear plants. But maintenance issues dogging the plants have left France at risk of power cuts in case of an extremely cold winter.

The two leaders also affirmed their countries’ commitment to backing Ukraine “to the end of” its conflict with invaders Russia.

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