• Germany's news in English
 
app_header_v3

Steinbrück defends low wage Chancellor remark

The Local · 5 Jan 2013, 13:56

Published: 05 Jan 2013 13:56 GMT+01:00

"I will not conceal this truth, not even as Chancellor candidate," Steinbrück told the Tagesspiegel newspaper on Saturday.

The former finance minister denied he had demanded the Chancellor's wages - currently €17,000 a month plus benefits – be increased. He had only suggested that the Chancellor was paid too little in comparison with business leaders – specifically with bank managers - a position he defended.

"I say what I think and I do what I say," he told the paper, adding that he intended to continue to speak plainly in the future, even as his Social Democrat (SPD) colleagues struggled to repair the damage to their party's reputation.

The issue of money has dogged Steinbrück since he launched his campaign for the autumn 2013 general election. He was first accused of using his influence when finance minister to gain sponsorship for a chess match, then admitted he earned €1.25 million for speeches.

The SPD candidate did however admit his comments about the wage paid for the job he was seeking could have been misunderstood by people struggling to get by on low incomes.

“Of course you can live well on that,“ said Steinbrück, especially from the perspective of a single mother on €1,000 a month.

Steinbrück dismissed as “nonsense“ accusations that he himself was after a higher wage should he topple Merkel in the election. Anyone not happy with a wage should not apply for the job, he said.

Story continues below…

DAPD/The Local/jlb

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

16:15 January 5, 2013 by lucksi
Man, so many great pics of that man about :D

But lay off the poor man, he has already said that he wors 7 days a week, 12 to 13 hours daily. Thus breaking every rule in the book about working lenghts. And he still has time for some speeches next to his work. Or maybe his woring time included the speeches, who knows.
17:05 January 5, 2013 by realist1961
At this rate, Merkel will be paying Steinbrück to give speeches.
17:19 January 5, 2013 by twisted
I agree with Steinbrück in his comparison with what bankers are paid, but perhaps, no, not perhaps, certainly, bankers are way overpaid for what they do. How about some control on the banks so that more money flows to the employees and stockholders and less expensive loans.
17:47 January 5, 2013 by maxbrando
You Germans think like hourly workers. All of you - except for a very few. If you divide the number of working hours into their annual slaaries one will probably find that the banker/executive/political leader is working at or below the minimum wage. Do the math you jealous fools.
17:55 January 5, 2013 by raandy
If he owns a dog, I bet it is a pug.
19:38 January 5, 2013 by IchBinKönig
Well, I'm looking forward to the story about Merkel's Photo-op with Blackface children.
22:24 January 5, 2013 by puisoh
17,000euros only, that's really a little low. You pay peanuts, you get monkeys, just look at the competency of the politicians.

When you pay enough, you get psychopathic bankers.
Today's headlines
Ansbach suicide attack
Sleepy Bavarian town left shocked by suicide attack
Ansbach. Photo: DPA

Residents of Ansbach were left reeling Monday after a Syrian suicide bomber blew himself up outside a music festival, shattering the sleepy calm of this picture-postcard southern German city.

Rapturous reception at Wagner fest's opening night
Bayreuther festival 2016, Parsifal. Photo: DPA

Germany's legendary Bayreuth opera festival, dedicated to the works of Richard Wagner, got off to a rapturous start on Monday with a brand new production of the composer's last opera, "Parsifal", enthusiastically received by the first-night audience.

Erdogan accuses EU of not paying up under migrant deal
Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Photo: DPA

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday accused the EU of not paying its way under a deal to send Syrian refugees back across the Aegean.

Ansbach suicide attack
Isis says Syrian bomber in Bavaria one of its 'soldiers'
Photo: DPA

The Syrian asylum seeker who blew himself up outside a music festival in Germany was a "soldier" of the Isis, the jihadist-linked Amaq news agency said on Monday.

Merkel's refugee policy was 'reckless': Left Party leader
Photo: DPA

The attacks carried out by refugees over the past week show accepting large numbers of refugees brings "significant problems", the party's chairwoman said on Monday.

Ansbach suicide attack
What we know about the Ansbach suicide bomber
The attacker's rucksack. Photo: DPA

He had had his asylum application rejected and had twice attempted suicide, say authorities.

Ansbach suicide attack
Ansbach suicide bomber confirms Isis loyalty in video
Police remove evidence from the bombers residence. Photo: DPA

The man who blew himself up in Ansbach, Bavaria, on Sunday evening, injuring 15 people, recorded a video in which he pledged his allegiance to terror group Isis.

Top 10 German firms with the highest-paid employees
Photo: DPA

Want to know which companies shell out the most for salaries?

How will Germany change after string of bloody attacks?
A policeman in Ansbach on Sunday evening. Photo: DPA

Within seven days Germany has been hit by four bloody attacks on innocent people on its streets and in a train. What does this unprecedented string of murders mean for the country?

After attacks, minister rejects blanket suspicion of refugees
Thomas de Maiziere. Photo: DPA

Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere on Monday cautioned Germans against indiscriminately branding all refugees a security threat after a rash of attacks over the last week.

Sponsored Article
Why you should attend an international job fair
DPA
Gallery
IN PICTURES: How Munich responded to shooting spree
Sponsored Article
Avoid hidden fees when sending money overseas
Lifestyle
10 rookie errors all Brits make when they arrive in Germany
National
Bavaria train attack: Were police right to shoot to kill?
Sponsored Article
Why Swiss hospitality graduates are in demand
National
How to get German citizenship (or just stay forever)
Sponsored Article
Five things Americans should know about voting abroad
Technology
Brexit will turn Berlin into 'Europe’s startup capital'
Travel
Six soothing day trips to escape the bustle of Berlin
International
'Germany needs to make UK come to its senses'
Features
Six odd things Germans do in the summer
Sponsored Article
Why expats choose international health insurance
Travel
These 10 little-known German towns are a must see
Features
How two gay dads cut through German red tape to start a family
Sponsored Article
Health insurance for expats in Germany: a quick guide
National
Five things to know about guns in Germany
Sponsored Article
Avoid hidden fees when sending money overseas
Culture
10 things you need to know before attending a German wedding
National
Eight weird habits you'll pick up living in Germany
Lifestyle
Six reasons 'super-cool' Berlin isn't all it's cracked up to be
Sponsored Article
Why Swiss hospitality graduates are in demand
Society
Only one country likes getting naked on the beach more than Germany
Lifestyle
23 ridiculously fascinating things you never knew about Berlin
Sponsored Article
Why you should attend an international job fair
Culture
8 German words that perfectly sum up your 20s
Lifestyle
Can't make it past the door at Berlin's most famous club? Help is at hand
Business & Money
Why Frankfurt could steal London's crown as Europe's finance capital
Features
6 surprising things I learned about Germany while editing The Local
Culture
Five sure-fire ways to impress Germans with your manners
10,692
jobs available
Toytown Germany
Germany's English-speaking crowd