• Germany edition
 
SPONSORED ARTICLE
How to join Scotland’s landed gentry

How to join Scotland’s landed gentry

Published: 16 Apr 2012 18:06 GMT+02:00
Updated: 16 Apr 2012 18:06 GMT+02:00

The intriguing concept, operated by the company Highland Titles, has its roots in conservation. The Scottish Highlands are truly beautiful and unspoiled, and once the ownership of the land is divided up between thousands of different people it makes it impossible for the land to be sold and later built upon.

As well as protecting the land from developers, Highland Titles undertake tree planting on a large scale. In the year of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, the company is celebrating 60 years of Queen Elizabeth II by planting 60 acres of native Scottish broadleaf trees.

“We sell land in Scotland to the general public to aid conservation and reforestation, and it costs as little as £30 (€36) per square foot,” says Highland Titles’ Lady Alex Flewitt. The company was formed when it’s founders realised that they would need the help of the public to carry out tree planting on a meaningful scale.

“We wanted to replant the land with native broadleaf trees like ash, elm, birch, willow or alder but ran out of money,” Lady Alex adds. “So we got the public involved with this unique selling point of becoming a Scottish landowner, which allows you to use the courtesy titles of Laird, Lord or Lady.”

The concept proved popular and the profits were ploughed back into purchasing more land. Having started with 20 acres, the company has now safeguarded 750 acres of land, ensuring that the scenery is there to be enjoyed by future generations and also providing a real haven for wildlife. There are 19 pairs of golden eagles that nest in Glencoe Wood, and the scenic landscape is a natural habitat for deer, badgers, stoats and foxes and hundred of species of lichen and moss.

“Our biggest markets are the UK, America and Australia but Europe is big for us now too. There seems to be a very large and enthusiastic Scottish contingent in Germany,” Lady Alex says. “It really does fascinate all sorts of people.”

Even though Scottish landowners can now be found in the far corners of the world, it is surprisingly common for landowners to visit plot. Some people plant flags and take photographs, whilst others take their tent and go camping.

Plots of various sizes can be bought online, from one square foot to 1,000 square feet, and every new landowner receives a certificate, a map with reference coordinates and a legal title deed – official documentation, recognised internationally, that enables you to change your title accordingly.

That’s when you can start to reap the rewards of your newfound status - everything from flight upgrades to shocking the policeman that pulls you over.

Laird is an old Scottish word meaning ‘landowner’. Both men and women can adopt the title Laird, or choose Lord or Lady respectively. Whilst these titles are fun and impressive, they are quite different from the titles bestowed by the British queen. Nonetheless, Lady Alex has experienced advantages that far outweigh the cost of her sole square foot of land.

“I’ve changed my credit and debit cards and drivers license,” she says. “And I use my title when I’m travelling anywhere – booking flights and hotels – and often get upgraded!”

Another reason for owning a piece of Scotland is ancestry. The recent surge of popularity in researching family history has prompted interest “Quite rightly, people are very proud of their Scottish ancestry, and now it can be celebrated by owning a little piece of Scottish land,” she adds.

Highland Titles next project is to unite their global network.

“Our community is really thriving on Facebook so, via social networking, we are looking towards arranging some events in Scotland and around the world to connect our Lords, Ladies and Lairds,” Lady Alex says.

And even if owning such a title is not for you, it could be for someone you know – the perfect present perhaps for the person who already has everything.

Article sponsored by Highland Titles

Related links:

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Today's headlines
Germany has just ten Ebola beds
Photo: DPA

Germany has just ten Ebola beds

Doctors at high-level infectious disease clinics say that caring for patients with the Ebola virus is much more intensive than they first thought, meaning they can handle fewer cases at once. READ  

Refugee Crisis
Now Berlin turns to tents to house refugees
A refugee protests on the roof of the former Gerhart Hauptmann School in Berlin. Photo: DPA

Now Berlin turns to tents to house refugees

Berlin has turned to huge tents and shipping containers to shelter growing numbers of refugees. With winter approaching, city politicians have called on the federal government for help. READ  

Ludwigshafen explosion kills one, injures 11
An eyewitness captured the moment of the explosion on their phone. Photo: DPA

Ludwigshafen explosion kills one, injures 11

UPDATE: One person has died and at least 11 others are injured after a huge explosion in western Germany on Thursday. READ  

Clueless Merkel forgets the F-word
Merkel suffers from Wortfindungsstörung at the IT summit in Hamburg. Photo: DPA

Clueless Merkel forgets the F-word

Angela Merkel's government is often criticized for its lack of understanding of all things digital and an appearance by the chancellor in Hamburg, which was supposed to change those perceptions, has only made things worse. READ  

Greenpeace finds danger in kids clothes
Photo: DPA

Greenpeace finds danger in kids clothes

Research released on Thursday by environmental group Greenpeace showed that more than half of clothing sold by German discount brands contain chemicals known to be dangerous to health and the environment, with items from Aldi being the worst offenders. READ  

Woman sues for accidental pot raid
Photo: DPA

Woman sues for accidental pot raid

A Bavarian woman is suing police for unlawful search after a reported break-in at her home led authorities to discover 158 cannabis plants in her basement. READ  

Germany lags in permits for non-EU migrants
Photo: DPA

Germany lags in permits for non-EU migrants

Germany gave out fewer residency permits last year per head to non-EU citizens than any other major European economy. READ  

Hamburg volunteers test Ebola vaccine
Hamburg's UKE has helped lead the fight against Ebola. Photo: DPA

Hamburg volunteers test Ebola vaccine

Volunteers have rolled up their sleeves for the first phase of the human trial for an Ebola vaccine at the Hamburg-Eppendorf University Clinic (UKE), it was announced on Wednesday evening. READ  

US adds voice to chorus telling Germany to spend
Jacob Lew and Sigmar Gabriel. Photo: DPA

US adds voice to chorus telling Germany to spend

US Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, in a meeting on Wednesday with German Economy Minister Sigmar Gabriel, called on Germany to boost public spending to stimulate stuttering eurozone growth, the Treasury said. READ  

Man leaps with son, 5, from third-floor window
Schönhauser Allee in Berlin. Photo: DPA

Man leaps with son, 5, from third-floor window

A father and his young son are in serious condition after police and firefighters were called to their home in northeast Berlin early on Wednesday morning. READ  

RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER AND ALERTS
Photo: DPA
Gallery
PHOTOS: Huge explosion rocks Ludwigshafen
Photo: DPA/Shutterstock
Gallery
Which high school cliche is your German city?
Photo: DPA
Gallery
Storm hits southern Germany
Sponsored Article
An international school unlike any other : School on the Rhine
Photo: Fitzpatrick family
Society
'We still don't know what happened to Matthew'
Photo: Mariana Schroeder
Munich
Special Report: Hope and chaos at Munich's refugee shelters
Photo: DPA
Berlin
Robbers blow up Berlin bank
Photo: DPA
Culture
Can you top our history quiz leaderboard?
Photo: Facebook
Society
German motorcycle gang joins Isis fight
Photo: DPA
Politics
UKIP ‘seeks EU pact’ with German satirical party
Photo: DPA/Shutterstock
Gallery
11 things Germans are afraid of...
Photo: DPA
Business & Money
JobTalk: All you need to know about working in Germany
National
Share news tips with The Local Germany
Sponsored Article
Bilingual education from nursery to graduation at Phorms
Latest news from The Local in Austria

More news from Austria at thelocal.at

Latest news from The Local in Switzerland

More news from Switzerland at thelocal.ch

Latest news from The Local in Denmark

More news from Denmark at thelocal.dk

Latest news from The Local in Spain

More news from Spain at thelocal.es

Latest news from The Local in France

More news from France at thelocal.fr

Latest news from The Local in Italy

More news from Italy at thelocal.it

Latest news from The Local in Norway

More news from Norway at thelocal.no

Latest news from The Local in Sweden

More news from Sweden at thelocal.se

3,523
jobs available
Toytown Germany
Germany's English-speaking crowd