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PODCAST: Is Germany really one of the hardest countries to start a new life in?

The Local Germany
The Local Germany - [email protected]
PODCAST: Is Germany really one of the hardest countries to start a new life in?
Germany in Focus. A podcast by The Local. Image: The Local

This week we talk about major strike action, rents in German cities, the German love for Helene Fischer and Schlager music, why the Bundestag is shrinking, why Germany is so hard for foreigners to start a new life in and how to get on with your neighbours.

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In the latest episode, host Rachel Loxton is joined by The Local Germany journalists Rachel Stern and Aaron Burnett.

We start off by discussing what a 'megastrike' in Germany could look like. Since we recorded the podcast, unions have called a nationwide transport strike on Monday March 27th. 

We also talk about whether people can get a paid day off if they can't get to work or find childcare due to industrial action. 

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Next we get into about rent developments in Germany’s biggest cities; where rents are rising fastest and where renting is most expensive. 

If you’re not familiar with Schlager music, don’t worry, we have you covered! We take a deep dive into the genre and talk about why Schlager legend Helene Fisher has been in the German news. 

The German Bundestag - one of the largest parliaments in the world - is going to get smaller. We try to explain why and what it all means. 

A new survey found that Germany is one of the most difficult places for foreigners to get started in. We talk about that and hear from Kathleen Parker of Red Tape Translation, which helps immigrants in Germany with admin and bureaucracy. 

Lastly, we share some tips about how to get on with your neighbours in Germany.

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