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WORKING IN GERMANY

6.6 million people ‘set to benefit from €12 minimum wage’ in Germany

According to a new study, Germany's new €12 minimum wage will benefit more than 6.6 million people when it comes into force on October 1st.

Euro coins in a jar
Euro coins in a jar. Photo: picture alliance/dpa/Unsplash | Clark Germany GmbH

Currently, around 6.64 million workers in Germany earn less than €12 gross per hour, according to new statistics published by the Hans Böckler Foundation’ Institute of Economic and Social Research (WSI), a trade union-linked research foundation. 

Among those now benefiting from the increase, 2.55 million are in full-time employment, according to the WSI. Nationwide, just under one in ten full-time workers and around 20 percent of part-time workers earn less than €12 per hour. Among mini-jobbers, the figure is as high as 80 percent.

Under a flagship policy of the Social Democrats (SPD), Germany’s national minimum wage is set to increase from €10.45 to €12 per hour on October 1st. The last increase was on July 1st this year. 

READ ALSO: ‘Biggest pay rise of their lives’: Germany hikes minimum wage to €12

The move is “a ray of hope in these difficult times” that will help low-paid workers handle the rising cost of living, Stefan Körzell, an executive board member of the German Trade Unions Federation (DGB), said on Tuesday. 

However, the DGB said more controls were needed to ensure that workers actually receive the statutory minimum wage. According the trade unions, employees across numerous sectors are currently earning less than the legal minimum. 

“The federal government must significantly increase the staffing of the responsible authority, Finanzkontrolle Schwarzarbeit,” Körzell said.

In addition to the wage hike, unions are also calling for more relief from the government to help cushion the impact of the rising cost of living. 

In particular, they are advocating for energy price flat rate and an energy price cap that could be paid for by skimming off the “excess profits of the large energy and mineral oil companies”, Körzell explained. 

From Wednesday, the DGB will run information campaigns on the minimum wage increase at more than 230 railway stations and market places throughout Germany.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: Will Germany set a gas price cap and how would it work?

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IMMIGRATION

EXPLAINED: How Germany plans to make immigration easier for skilled workers

The German government has agreed on a set of reforms for the immigration of skilled workers, which was approved by the cabinet on Wednesday. Here's what they're planning.

EXPLAINED: How Germany plans to make immigration easier for skilled workers

What’s happening?

Germany is currently facing a dramatic skilled worker shortage, particularly in the health sector, IT, construction, architecture, engineering and building services. The German government currently expects that, by 2026, there will be 240,000 jobs for which there will be no qualified candidates.

In order to help plug the gap in the labour market, the coalition government has been proposing changes to immigration law for months.

In September, Labour Minister Hubertus Heil presented plans for a new points-based immigration system, that will enable non-EU workers to come to Germany to look for work even without a job offer, as long as they fulfil certain criteria, under a so-called “Opportunity Card” (Chancenkarte) scheme.

READ ALSO: Explained: How to apply for Germany’s new ‘opportunity card’ and other visas for job seekers

Now, the coalition government has agreed on a wide-ranging set of initiatives to help remove hurdles for skilled workers coming to Germany. The points were approved by the cabinet on Wednesday, who should then come up with a draft law in the first quarter of 2023.

What’s in the plans?

The central aim of the government’s plans is to make it easier for people from outside the EU to find a job in Germany.

In the draft paper, ministers distinguish between three so-called pillars, the first of which concerns the requirements that foreign specialists must meet in order to be allowed to work in Germany.

Until now, they have had to have a recognized degree and an employment contract, but the government wants to lower this hurdle.

The draft states: “For specialists who are unable to present documents relating to their professional qualifications or can only do so in part, for reasons for which they themselves are not responsible, an entry and residence option should nevertheless be created.” The competencies could then be finally examined once they have arrived in Germany.

A trainee electrician practices in a training centre in Cologne. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Oliver Berg

The second pillar involves skilled workers from abroad who do not yet have a degree but already have a lot of professional experience.

For employees in the information and communications technology sector, the requirement of having sufficient German language skills would be waived, and it would then be up to the managers of the company making the job offer to decide whether or not they want to employ the skilled worker despite a lack of German language skills. 

READ ALSO: ‘More jobs in English’: How Germany could attract international workers

The third pillar is about enabling third-country nationals with good potential to stay in Germany in order to find a job. The “Opportunity Card” falls under this pillar and will involve a new points-based system, which will allow non-EU nationals to come to Germany to look for work even without a job offer as long as they fulfil at least three of the criteria of having a degree or professional qualification, having experience of at least three years, having a language skill or previous residence in Germany and are under 35.

READ ALSO: How to apply for Germany’s new opportunity card and other visas for job seekers

What other initiatives do the plans include?

The traffic light coalition also wants to do more to promote Germany as an attractive, innovative and diverse country abroad.

One initiative is to publicise job vacancies internationally and connect qualified people abroad with employers and educational institutions in Germany. 

READ ALSO: Will immigration reform be enough to combat Germany’s worker shortage?

The “Make it in Germany” portal, which has its own job exchange, will be expanded and further developed.

The government also wants to promote the German language both abroad and at home for example, by expanding digital language courses and exams.

The government also wants to simplify and accelerate the recognition procedures for foreign vocational qualifications. One of the planned measures is that the required documents can also be accepted in English or in the original language.

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