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GERMANY AND RUSSIA

Scholz calls Putin’s announcements ‘act of desperation’

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz on Wednesday condemned President Vladimir Putin's order for a partial military mobilisation to support Russia's war in Ukraine and the holding of annexation referendums as an "act of desperation".

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz speaks in New York.
German Chancellor Olaf Scholz speaks in New York. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Michael Kappeler

Speaking on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly in New York, Scholz insisted Russia “cannot win this criminal war” in Ukraine and that Putin “with his most recent decisions makes everything much worse”.

The German leader said Putin had “from the start completely underestimated Ukrainians’ will to resist” as well as the “unity and determination” of Kyiv’s allies.

“Sham referendums” in four Russian-occupied regions of Ukraine would “of course never be accepted” by the international community, Scholz said, and would hence be “no justification” for Russia’s “intention, namely to conquer land of its neighbour with violence”.

“In the world in which we live, the law must win out over force and force can never be stronger than the law,” he said.

Germany’s vice chancellor Robert Habeck had earlier slammed the partial military mobilisation as a “bad and wrong step”.

“With the partial mobilisation (Russia) is further escalating this war of aggression that violates international law,” he tweeted.

“A bad and wrong step, which we strongly condemn… We continue to fully support Ukraine.”

Scholz believes the move signals that Russia’s campaign in Ukraine “is not going successfully”, his deputy spokesman Wolfgang Buechner told reporters.

Russia had to pull its troops back from Kyiv early in the war and also did not achieve the successes it hoped for in the east, where Ukraine has mounted a lightning counter-offensive, the spokesman noted.

Ukraine had been “very effective in defending its integrity and sovereignty not least because of the massive… support from countries of the world, especially Germany”, he added.

Finance Minister Christian Lindner told a press conference the mobilisation indicated the war will last for a long time, and “we must adjust politically and economically”.

In a pre-recorded address to the nation early on Wednesday, Putin announced the mobilisation and vowed to use “all available means” to protect Russian territory, after Moscow-held regions of Ukraine suddenly announced the annexation referendums.

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UKRAINE

Reader question: Can Ukrainians get dual nationality in Germany?

Most non-EU citizens who want to become naturalised German citizens have to give up their existing passport first. Do the same rules apply to Ukrainians?

Reader question: Can Ukrainians get dual nationality in Germany?

Before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, people with Ukrainian citizenship were treated much like most other third-country nationals: according to Germany’s strict rules on dual nationality, the vast majority were asked to give up their existing passport before naturalising as a German.

However, the outbreak of war on Ukrainian soil has complicated matters significantly. 

Firstly, the majority of Ukrainians who have come to Germany over the past year have arrived as refugees. At the latest count, almost a million refugees had travelled to Germany from Ukraine in 2022 – though some of these may now have returned home.

German immigration law specifies a number of exceptions to the dual nationality ban. One of these stipulates that asylum seekers can keep their existing nationality if they choose to naturalise in Germany. That means that Ukrainian refugees would automatically qualify for dual nationality – as long as they meet other requirements for citizenship, such as at least six years of continued residency and B1 German language skills.

READ ALSO: German citizenship: Can people who apply before the law changes get dual nationality?

Most recently, however, the Interior Ministry passed a further significant change to the law. On September 6th, the ministry agreed to waive the requirement to give up previous nationalities for Ukrainian citizens applying for a German passport. This change applies to all Ukrainians who fit the requirements for citizenship – not just refugees.

The reasoning behind the change is that the government assumes that, given the current conflict, it’s likely to be impossible for Ukrainians to give up their citizenship.

Understandably at a time of war, numerous aspects of everyday bureaucracy have been put on hold in Ukraine. That means that applications to renounce Ukrainian citizenships are currently not being processed at all.

In situations like these, where an application to give up a previous citizenship is not likely to be granted – or is likely to be refused – Germany has another exception in place. In such cases, citizenship offices are required to allow the applicant to become a naturalised German without requiring them to dispense with their previous nationality. 

When is the best time to apply?

According to the Interior Ministry, the relaxed rules for Ukrainians will only apply as long as the conflict continues. That means that, if the situation stabilises and authorities begin processing applications to renounce citizenship again, Germany may well decide to tighten up its rules once more.

That means that it could be advisable for Ukrainians who are eligible to apply for German citizenship to submit their application as soon as possible.

However, it’s also worth mentioning that the government is currently planning to relax the dual nationality rules across the board.

Though it’s unclear when this will take place, it is believed to be a priority project for the SPD-led Interior Ministry, which could mean that citizenship rules are liberalised within a matter of months.

That would mean that everyone could be entitled to hold multiple nationalities in Germany, regardless of their original citizenship.

For more information on the upcoming changes to dual nationality and citizenship rules, see our explainers below: 

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