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WEATHER

5 ways to talk about the heat like a true German

With another heat wave just around the corner, here are some of the German phrases that will help you express yourself in the hot weather.

A woman pours mineral water into her mouth.
A woman pours mineral water into her mouth. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Wolfgang Kumm

1. Mir ist heiß

Firstly, it’s worth pointing out how to correctly express the fact that you’re hot in German.

In German, you say mir ist heiß using the dative form of the personal pronoun ich.

Be careful not to directly translate the English sentence “I am hot” into ich bin heiß as most Germans will understand this to mean that you are hot in a more sensual sense of the word.

Examples:

Mir ist heiß, so furchtbar heiß.
I am hot, so terribly hot.
 
Mir ist es hier zu heiß.
It’s too hot for me here. 

2. Was für eine Affenhitze!

Baboons sit in the shade of a rock in their enclosure at Hellabrunn Zoo in Munich. Photo: picture alliance / dpa | Rebecca Krizak

The word Affenhitze is a colloquial term used for very high temperatures and literally means “monkey heat”. It’s widely believed that the term first appeared at the end of the 18th century in Berlin.

At that time, the monkey house in the Berlin Zoological Garden was known for being extremely hot, so people started to speak about “heat like in the monkey house”. Over time, the phrase became shortened into the phrase widely used today.

Example:

Morgen herrscht wieder eine Affenhitze.

Tomorrow will be another scorcher.

3. Es ist brütend heiß!

Two chickens walk over a bale of straw at Gut Mahndorf in Mahndorf, Saxony-Anhalt.

Two chickens walk over a bale of straw at Gut Mahndorf in Mahndorf, Saxony-Anhalt. Photo: picture alliance / dpa | Matthias Bein

The adjective brütend comes from the verb brüten meaning to breed or to incubate. It is likely, therefore, that it made its way into common parlance about the weather, from the fact that raising younglings involves keeping them nice and warm.

Hier drin ist brütend heiß!

It’s sweltering hot in here!

4. Ich schmore in diese Hitze

More commonly used in the cooking lexicon, the verb schmoren meaning ‘to stew’, or ‘to sizzle’ is often used to express the feeling of being exposed to high temperatures.  A comparable English phrase would be, “I am sizzling in this heat”.

5. die Sonne knallt!

A poppy flower shines in the light of the midday sun on a field near Frankfurt (Oder) in Brandenburg. Photo: picture alliance / dpa | Patrick Pleul

One popular expression to do with the heat focuses on the source of the problem itself. The verb knallen means “to bang” or “to slam”.

Example:

Die Sonne knallt auch wenn es bewölkt ist!

The sun is blazing even when it’s cloudy!

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WEATHER

Will Germany see more snow this winter?

Over the weekend, large parts of Germany saw early snowfall, but will it continue throughout the winter?

Will Germany see more snow this winter?

Many parts of Germany experienced an early white Christmas over the weekend, as snow fell from Berlin to the Baltic Sea. Hesse also saw at least the first swirl of snowflakes and there was light snow in the Siegerland and the Hochsauerland districts of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Some areas of the country were hit particularly hard by the snow – a few centimetres of snow fell in Kassel, while large parts of Bavaria experienced heavy snowfall on Saturday.

READ ALSO: Surviving winter: 8 tips for enjoying the cold like a true German

There were also numerous accidents on icy roads in North Rhine-Westphalia, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Schleswig-Holstein and Bavaria. 

Will there be more snowfall this week?

Snowfall is expected at the beginning of the week in some areas in Thuringia and Saxony, while further south, there is likely to be snowfall only at high altitudes – such as in the Bavarian Alps.

Snow lies on the beach in Zingst, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Georg Moritz

In the coming days, temperatures will rise again and the weather will become milder. According to the German Weather Service (DWD) temperatures will hover between 5C and 12C for most of the country, while only the northeast and east see maximum temperatures of 0C to 4C.

Will there be more snow this winter?

2022 has already broken weather records in Germany – the period from January to the end of October was the warmest since weather records began almost 140 years ago.

READ ALSO: ‘A glimpse into our climate future’: Germany logs warmest October on record

Various weather models have already simulated the coming winter in Europe and Germany and provide estimations on how much warmer the coming winter is likely to be than from the years 1961 to 1990.

The models created by NASA, DWD, and the Climate Forecast System all agree that trend of rising temperatures will probably continue over the winter. Between December and February, it’s expected that the mercury will be between 1C and 3C higher than it was between 1961 and 1990. 

Meteorologist Corinna Borau from wetter.com told the Frankfurter Rundschau that she thinks that it’s extremely unlikely that there will be further snowfall in December in Germany.

“If the month looks rather dry and too mild overall, then we can’t expect large amounts of snow” Borau said. 

According to Borau, January is unlikely to be a “snow bomb” either, though it will still “feel like winter” and snow is only expected to fall sporadically. In February, however, the chances of snowfall are higher than in previous months.

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