SHARE
COPY LINK
For members

CHILDREN

What you need to know about Germany’s new parental benefits reforms

Juggling family life and work can be tough. A new series of reforms on parental allowances and time off work after the birth a child aim to make it easier.

What you need to know about Germany's new parental benefits reforms
A father walks with his child in the fall in Ludwigsburg. Photo: DPA

The Bundestag passed a series of reforms on Friday, with the aim of helping families reconcile personal and work life even better, said Family Minister Franziska Giffey of the Social Democrats (SPD).

Mothers and fathers of premature babies are to receive Elterngeld (parental allowance given out during the Elternzeit, or parental leave) for longer in future.

In addition, options for part-time work while receiving Elterngeld and for sharing Elternzeit between mothers and fathers will be expanded.

The reforms have to pass through the Bundesrat, and will likely come into force in September.

Extra benefits for early birth

For children born six weeks before the due date of birth, an additional month of Elterngeld is to be paid under the new regulations.

If the child is born eight weeks early, two additional months will be granted, three extra months will be given for children born 12 weeks early and four additional months if there was an early birth of 16 weeks. 

“We want to give parents special support during this difficult and emotionally demanding time, so that they can give their children the attention they need,” said CDU/CSU deputy parliamentary party leader Nadine Schön.

Who receives Elterngeld?

Elterngeld is one of the most important state family benefits, with more than €7 billion spent on it each year. Mothers and fathers receive the benefit if they do not work or work part time after the the birth of their child. 

The state supports this with a minimum of €300 and a maximum of €1800 per month – depending on the net earnings before the birth of the child. 

It is paid for a maximum of 14 months if both parents participate in the Elternzeit. The payment period can also be extended further but with smaller monthly payments.

READ ALSO: Here’s how Germany plans to reform Elterngeld for new parents

More flexible rules

The rules for parents who want to work part-time while receiving Elterngeld will also be made more flexible under the new rules: the amount of weekly permitted working hours will increase from 30 to 32 hours – making a four-day work week mathematically possible. 

In addition, the requirements for the so-called partnership bonus, if both parents work part-time at the same time, will be relaxed.

To finance the changes, top-earning couples with a combined income of more than €300,000 will no longer receive Elterngeld. The limit was previously €500,000.

According to the Federal Ministry of Family Affairs, the plans are also intended to ease the bureaucratic burden on parents, parental allowance offices and employers. 

For example, parents who work part-time while receiving Elterngeld would only have to provide proof of their working hours in exceptional cases.

What do opposition parties say?

The opposition criticised parts of the proposal: The reform is overdue, said the Free Democrats (FDP), who at the same time called for the time in which parents receive Elterngeld be extended in some instances.

For  example, this could apply if parents may take their children to Kitas (daycare) for the first time later than originally planned due to coronavirus related restrictions, and need to spend more time at home with them.

The Left Party called for the minimum amount of parental allowance to be increased from €300 to €400 and from €150 to €200 euros for the so-called Elterngeld Plus, which allows parents to work part time during their Elternzeit.

The far-right (Alternative for Germany) AfD criticized the plans as “meagre tinkering” with a system in need of more fundamental reform.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.
For members

FAMILY

Reader question: Do all children born in Germany automatically receive German citizenship?

If a baby is born in Germany, does the child become Deutsch? The answer may not be so straightforward, for both foreign and sometimes even German parents.

Reader question: Do all children born in Germany automatically receive German citizenship?

In the US, stories abound of expecting parents who travel to the country on the brink of giving birth, and then have a baby who’s automatically granted American citizenship. 

But does the same rule – when foreign parents receive citizenship for their child in the country it’s born – also apply in Germany?

The short answer is no – at least not automatically. 

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: Who is entitled to German citizenship by descent and how to apply for it

Contrary to what some people might assume, if a baby is born to two foreign parents in Germany, the child does not receive German citizenship upon birth, according to Germany’s Foreign Ministry. 

But there are a couple of ways in which the child can still become a German passport holder.

Parent(s) who are long-term German residents

Any child born in Germany after January 1st, 2000 to at least one foreign parent who has resided continuously in Germany for at least eight years and is a permanent resident, qualifies for German citizenship in addition to the citizenship of the parents.

But there’s a catch: according to the German Optionspflict, “the child must decide at some stage between the age of 18 and 23 whether to retain his or her German nationality or another nationality acquired by birth,” wrote the German Foreign Ministry.

The requirement to choose is only in place, however, for children who received German citizenship through a parent who’s a long-term resident of Germany.

If the parent holds a German passport, the child doesn’t need to choose, unless it’s required by the other country of which they’re a passport holder.

That means that if a foreign parent gets German citizenship after their child is born, they can also receive a German passport for their offspring.

READ ALSO: How foreigners can get fast track citizenship in Germany

A man holds a German passport in his hand.

A man holds a German passport in his hand. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Fabian Sommer

Loopholes even with a German parent 

It may seem like a given that having one German parent would grant citizenship to a child born in Germany, but that’s not always the case.

If the parents are not married and the father is German, he will need to make sure to fill out a Vaterschaftsanerkennung (recognition of paternity) before the citizenship can be claimed.

Families in which one parent is German and the other foreign also often assume that only one passport is needed, but things can get a little tricky.

Let’s say the mother is a British passport holder and the father possesses a German passport. While their offspring can easily travel to the UK without an issue, they may encounter difficulties reentering Germany unless their kid has an official deutschen Reisepass.

And it goes without saying that a child born to a German parent abroad, whether the father or mother, is also required to officially apply for a German passport in order for German nationality to be recognised.

SHOW COMMENTS