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Meet the German airport dog sniffing out huge bundles of cash

Money talks, they say, but for some, money also smells.

Meet the German airport dog sniffing out huge bundles of cash
Here's an archive photo of Aki with some of her cash finds. Photo: DPA

Aki, a nine-year old Belgian Shepherd dog based at Frankfurt's international airport in Germany, sniffed out almost a quarter of million euros in cash from travellers in a few days.

Between the end of June and the start of July, Aki caught 12 passengers carrying a total of €247,280 ($290,540), according to the airport's customs office.

In one incident, the nosy mutt sniffed out almost €52,000 in the belt bag of a passenger.

Other cash was found in handbags, shoulder bags and inside jacket pockets.

“With her keen nose, Aki supports the custom officers… in the fight against tax evasion, money laundering and international terrorism,” said Isabell Gillmann, spokeswoman at the customs office in Frankfurt, Germany's business capital.

READ ALSO: Customs dog sniffs out €1.2 million in cash at Düsseldorf airport

All 12 travellers could face fines.

In 2019, customs officials in Frankfurt caught passengers carrying a total of around €23.6 million in undeclared cash.

According to EU laws in place since 2007, if passengers enter or leave the EU with €10,000 or more in cash, they must declare it and its origins to Customs.

These regulations are in place to help investigators detect any illegal activity involving high volumes of cash, such as drug trafficking or money laundering.

Corona dogs?

German sniffer dogs may also be put to use in the battle against coronavirus.

Researchers from Hanover's University of Veterinary Medicine found in July that man's best friend could detect Covid-19 in human samples, suggesting that in future they could be deployed in transport centres or sporting events.

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Could sleeper trains offer Germans cheap, low-carbon travel across Europe?

Several political parties in Germany have said they want to bring back sleeper trains in order to meet carbon emissions targets.

Could sleeper trains offer Germans cheap, low-carbon travel across Europe?
A sleeper train in Austria. Photo: dpa/APA | Georg Hochmuth

The Green party have said that they want to put state subsidies into night trains that will connect Germany with cities as far flung as St Petersburg in the north and Lisbon in the south.

According to the environmentalist party’s plans, 40 night rail lines could connect 200 destinations across the continent including islands like Mallorca, which would be linked in by train and ferry.

The Greens want the EU to buy a fleet of sleeper trains that could travel at speeds of between 200 km/h and 250 km/h.

The CDU have also announced plans to rebuild the country’s sleeper train services.

Deutsche Bahn stopped its last sleeper service in 2016 citing the high costs involved in maintaining its fleet that was not recuperated through ticket sales.

Earlier this year the state owned company said it had “no plans” to purchase new sleeper wagons.

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