SHARE
COPY LINK

FOOTBALL

German football plans May return amid raging debate

German football authorities are set to announce plans on Thursday for Bundesliga matches to restart on May 9th in empty stadiums, but the potential return in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic is meeting some opposition.

German football plans May return amid raging debate
Borussia Mönchengladbach playing a ghost game on May 11th. Photo: DPA

Chancellor Angela Merkel's government is slowly easing nationwide restrictions and the resumption of the Bundesliga, which was halted on March 13th, would boost morale in football-mad Germany.

It would also make the Bundesliga the first top-flight European league to begin playing again.

Large public events are banned in Germany until August 31st, yet football could resume without spectators — known as “ghost games” in German. Germany has more testing capacity than other European countries and players could be tested regularly.

READ ALSO: Coronavirus forces first ever Bundesliga game in Germany behind closed doors

The 18 clubs have been back in training for three weeks, albeit in small groups with social distancing observed even on the pitch.

Having already been given signs of encouragement by politicians, the German Football League (DFL) is set to iron out details in Thursday's video conference meeting of the clubs.

Final approval could be given by Merkel and regional state premiers at a meeting on April 30th.

The DFL is desperate for the league season to be completed by June 30th to ensure payment of the next instalment of television money, worth around 300 million.

The cash could keep some clubs alive, with 13 of the 36 clubs in Germany's top two tiers reportedly on the verge of insolvency.

With fans across Europe and the world deprived of football, the games are also likely to attract TV audiences far beyond Germany.

Cardboard supporters

With fans locked out and asked to stay at home, only players, backroom staff, stewards, media and officials will be allowed into the stadiums for games with numbers strictly regulated.

Some clubs are being innovative about the problem of potentially playing in near-empty stadiums.

Borussia Mönchengladbach have filled their terraces with life-sized cardboard cut-outs of fans.

However, the restart is unpopular in some quarters and criticism has come from some supporters' groups.

Critics point to figures of more than 140,000 cases of coronavirus and over 4,500 deaths in Germany as proof that football is inappropriate.

Restarting the season in the middle of the pandemic “would be sheer mockery for the rest of society” according to supporters' group Fanszenen Deutschlands, who accuse the clubs of greed.

“Professional football has long been sick enough and should continue to be quarantined,” it said.

Nationwide fan group “Unsere Kurve” ha also slammed the move.

Football “cannot act in isolation from the situation in society as a whole,” it said. “If the game continues like this, we're out!”

Even some players are uncomfortable about returning to action in the current situation.

The Borussia-Park stadium in Mönchengladbach. Photo: DPA

“There are more important things than football at the moment,” said Bayern Munich defender Niklas Suele.

In Berlin, Union forward Sebastian Polter said “nobody wants ghost games — no player, no fan” even if they appear to the only option to complete the season.

READ ALSO: Coronavirus: German football bosses set to decide fate of Bundesliga games

It will also take around 20,000 tests of players and backroom staff to be able to complete all the remaining matches.

Germany has a testing capacity of 550,000 per week, so 20,000 tests spread over the nine remaining Bundesliga matchdays seems manageable.

However, the Robert Koch Institute, which advises the German government, sees things differently.

“I think the tests should be used where it makes medical sense,” the institute's vice-president Lars Schaade said on Tuesday.

“I do not see why certain population groups, whether athletes or otherwise, should be routinely screened.”

'Leap of faith'

Nevertheless, it seems highly likely the Bundesliga will return next month.

Markus Söder, the state premier of Bavaria, and Armin Laschet, head of North Rhine-Westphalia — two key German football strongholds — have voiced support.

Christian Seifert, the Bundesliga's CEO, has said the league's clubs and stars have a duty “to repay the trust” shown by the politicians.

Senior figures at Bayern Munich, who have a four-point lead at the top of the league, Borussia Dortmund and RB Leipzig have expressed similar gratitude.

“This is a great leap of faith,” said Dortmund CEO Hans-Joachim Watzke.

“Football is an opportunity to give millions of fans a little more zest for life again.”

 

Member comments

  1. I am a musician whose concerts are canceled because of the large event ban. I wish most of these festivals and venues had the vision to continue with the festival plans by streaming their concerts and pay out the fees to the musicians. These fees have already been reserved for these concerts and cancelling these concerts makes me wonder what happens to that money. (Moers Festival, for example, has decided to continue as a online festival and pay its musicians). I have received support from the Berlin Senate, but would have rather played those concerts and made the money rather then freaking out from getting money from the state as a non-EU freelancer.

    After all, music can also boost morale, right? Perhaps for at least as many people as football fans.

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

COVID-19 RULES

Germany should prepare for Covid wave in autumn, ministers warn

German health ministers say that tougher Covid restrictions should come back into force if a serious wave emerges in autumn.

Germany should prepare for Covid wave in autumn, ministers warn

Following a video meeting on Monday, the health ministers of Germany’s 16 states said tougher restrictions should be imposed again if they are needed. 

“The corona pandemic is not over yet – we must not be deceived by the current declining incidences,” said Saxony-Anhalt’s health minister Petra Grimm-Benne, of the Social Democrats, who currently chairs the Conference of Health Ministers (GMK).

According to the GMK, new virus variants are expected to appear in autumn and winter. Over the weekend, federal Health Minister Karl Lauterbach (SPD) also warned that the more dangerous Delta variant could return to Germany. “That is why the federal Ministry of Health should draw up a master plan to combat the corona pandemic as soon as possible and coordinate it with the states,” Grimm-Benne said.

Preparations should also include an amendment of the Infection Protection Act, ministers urged. They want to see the states given powers to react to the infection situation in autumn and winter. They called on the government to initiate the legislative process in a timely manner, and get the states actively involved.

The current Infection Protection Act expires on September 23rd this year. Germany has loosened much of its Covid restrictions in the last months, however, face masks are still compulsory on public transport as well as on planes. 

READ ALSO: Do people in Germany still have to wear Covid masks on planes?

The health ministers said that from autumn onwards, it should be possible for states to make masks compulsory indoors if the regional infection situation calls for it. Previously, wearing a Covid mask was obligatory in Germany when shopping and in restaurants and bars when not sitting at a table. 

Furthermore, the so-called 3G rule for accessing some venues and facilities – where people have to present proof of vaccination, recovery, or a negative test – should be implemented again if needed, as well as other infection protection rules, the ministers said. 

Bavaria’s health minister Klaus Holetschek, of the CSU, welcomed the ministers’ unanimous call for a revision of the Infection Protection Act. “The states must be able to take all necessary infection protection measures quickly, effectively, and with legal certainty,” he said.

North Rhine-Westphalia’s health minister Karl-Josef Laumann (CDU) warned that no one should “lull themselves into a false sense of security”.

“We must now prepare for the colder season and use the time to be able to answer important questions about the immunity of the population or the mechanisms of infection chains,” he said.

On Tuesday, Germany reported 86,253 Covid infections within the latest 24 hour period, as well as 215 Covid-related deaths. The 7-day incidence stood at 437.6 infections per 100,000 people. However, experts believe there could be twice as many infections because lots of cases go unreported. 

READ ALSO: Five things to know about the Covid pandemic in Germany right now

SHOW COMMENTS