SHARE
COPY LINK

LA

Baguette-loving Germans go fishing at French border for their pastry fix during pandemic

German gourmets refuse to let a virus keep them from their favourite French pastries, with one even resorting to a fishing rod to reel in his baguettes.

Baguette-loving Germans go fishing at French border for their pastry fix during pandemic
Hartmut Fey from Lauterbach, gets his French baguettes at the German-French border using a fishing rod to comply with measures to contain the coronavirus spread. Photo: DPA

Residents in the German border town of Lauterbach in Saarland are fond of popping across to neighbouring Carling in France for their daily croissants.

So when the border slammed shut to slow the spread of the coronavirus, many were bereft at no longer having access to their favourite boulangerie.

But baker Myriam Jansem-Boualit is going the extra mile – or at least, the extra few metres to the border – to make sure her German customers can still have their daily loaf.

EXPLAINED: How Germany and France's lockdown exit strategies compare

Hungry customers can telephone ahead with their orders, and Jansem-Boualit will meet them at the border crossing in the street outside her shop with the fresh baked delicacies.

Photo: DPA

“There used to be a lot of Germans who came here to buy bread,” she said. “They don't dare come any more because… there are checks. So what I can do now is bring the bread to them… across the barrier.”

Hartmut Fey, 52, is one of her happy customers.

“It has to do with tradition. We've been buying our baguettes and bread here in France for decades,” he said.

Fey has even published a video on social media showing himself retrieving his baguettes with a fishing rod. “It was an idea of mine to create awareness,” he said.

Fishing tackle is not compulsory, but with a steady stream of customers at the barrier, it seems Fey is not the only one who is hooked.

Member comments

  1. This isn’t funny, it’s desperately sad; we are Europeans but the states are beginning to Coopers up again. There is no sense in blanket prohibition when both states are taking similar precautions over people shopping. La Grande Region has been broken into 4 unsustainable pieces.

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

COVID-19 RULES

Bavaria pushes for stricter Covid regulations in autumn

Health ministers across Germany's 16 states are debating the government's new Covid plan - and politicians in Bavaria say they want more clarity.

Bavaria pushes for stricter Covid regulations in autumn

On Tuesday, federal and state health ministers planned to discuss the Covid protection proposals for autumn and winter presented last week by Health Minister Karl Lauterbach (SPD) and Justice Minister Marco Buschmann (FDP).

However, some states and politicians are not satisfied with the plans. 

Under the proposals, masks will remain mandatory in air and long-distance transport, as well as clinics, nationwide. But federal states will be able to choose themselves whether to introduce further measures like mandatory masks on public and regional transport.

States will also have the power to take tougher Covid measures if the situation calls for it, such as mandatory masks indoors, but lockdowns and school closures have been ruled out. 

READ ALSO Masks and no lockdowns: Germany’s new Covid plan from autumn to Easter

The draft law states that there can be exceptions from wearing masks in indoor spaces, such as restaurants, for recently Covid-vaccinated or recovered people. 

But Bavaria’s health minister Klaus Holetschek (CSU) told DPA that these planned exemptions were not justified because vaccinated and recovered people can still transmit infections. “There are clear gaps in the current draft law,” said the CSU politician.

Dominik Spitzer, health policy spokesman for the FDP parliamentary group in the Bavarian state parliament, also questioned this exception, saying the rules “simply made no sense”.

“With the current virus variant, that would be impossible to convey, since even vaccinated people can continue to carry the virus,” the FDP politician told Bavarian broadcaster BR24. 

The coalition government’s graduated plan under the new Infection Protection Act, is set to be in force from October 1st until April 7th next year. 

The powers for the states are a first step, “but they do not go far enough for us”, Holetschek added, while calling for some points to be tightened up. “We need strong guidelines for autumn and winter.”

Holetschek said the government needed to tighten up the criteria with which states can adopt and enforce more effective measures to protect against the spread of Covid-19.

READ ALSO: Could Germany see a ‘patchwork’ of Covid rules?

Meanwhile, CDU health politician Erwin Rüddel said Germany was on the “wrong track” and the country should find “a completely different approach” to Covid policy than it has so far.

He accused the coalition government of being in “panic mode” and said he doubted the Bundestag would pass the proposals.

“I believe, there will be significant changes (to the draft)”, he said.

But the chairperson of the doctors’ association Marburger Bund, Susanne Johna, backed the plans.

“The proposal for the new Infection Protection Act gives the states sufficient possibilities to react adequately to the infection situation,” Johna told the Rheinische Post on Tuesday.

“The states can take regionally adapted measures to protect people if the need arises. I can’t understand why this concept is being called into question right away.”

SHOW COMMENTS