The Lowdown

How to celebrate St. Martin’s Day in Germany

How to celebrate St. Martin's Day in Germany
No, this isn't the German version of Halloween. Archive photo shows lanterns hanging in a garden in Kassel on St. Martin's Day. Photo: DPA
Wednesday marks St. Martin's Day in Germany. But why exactly do we celebrate, and what do all these paper lanterns signify? The Local has the lowdown.

What exactly are we celebrating?

Martinstag is named after St. Martin of Tours, a Roman soldier who became a monk after being baptised as an adult. He was eventually made a saint by the Catholic Church for being a kind man who cut his cloak in half to share with a beggar during a snowstorm.

What do the lanterns mean?

In many parts of Germany it is traditional for children to participate in a procession of paper lanterns in remembrance of St. Martin. They make their own little lanterns in school or kindergarten and then gather on city streets to sing songs about good old Marty and their lanterns. Often a man dressed as St. Martin with a long red cloak leads the parade on horseback.

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So this is actually a big deal then?

It's officially a Catholic holiday, but in recent years the lantern processions have become widespread even in Protestant areas of Germany. So just like Santa Claus has little to do with the birth of Christ, these days St. Martin Day's is probably better known for the luminous procession than the saintly history.

So what do I do on St. Martin’s Day?

Normally, if you have kids, you’ll probably spend the evening outside with a bunch of other parents and their children. In 2020, these parades won't take place throughout most of Germany, but people are being urged to find alternative ways to celebrate the holiday, such as displaying lit-up lanterns in their windows.

You’ll be busy relighting the tea candles in those fiddly little lanterns with cold, stiff fingers, and drying off children's tears because, as upsetting it is for the kids, paper lanterns lit by candles tend to catch fire quite quickly. Who would have thought…

Heavens! That sounds dangerous.

Well, definitely worrying for the parents, forced to prevent their little ones from accidentally setting each other on fire during the procession. But on the other hand, it wouldn’t really be a proper St. Martin’s procession without someone stamping out a flaming lantern, or a sad-faced child clutching to a charred stick.

What do I do if I don’t have children? Is there anything else to it?

Like most holidays, St. Martin's Day is also about eating food. The traditional victuals are goose with red cabbage and dumplings.

A St. Martin's Day parade in Riedlingen, Baden-Württemberg on Sunday. Photo: DPA

Yummy! But why goose?

According to legend, Martin was reluctant to become a bishop as an honour for all his good deeds, so he hid in a stable filled with geese to escape from Church officials. Martin might have been a very kind and gentle man, but he apparently wasn’t the smartest. Otherwise he would have considered a better hiding place than a pen filled with gabbling geese – who ended up giving away his location.

And the geese had to pay for that?

Perhaps, but the more likely reason is that November 11th is the beginning of Advent fasting and hardcore Catholics get a last chance to feast before they abstain from greasy food and booze until Christmas.

And if I am not Catholic, don’t like goose and have no children?

Then you might want to huddle around one of the many Martin bonfires, eat something else or simply celebrate the beginning of carnival, as it starts on November 11th as well.

READ MORE: Stricter rules means no pony for St Martin

 


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