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BREXIT

How a group of Brits took up a struggle for millions of their co-citizens: Part One

In the first instalment of a three-part series investigating how different, often separate, campaign groups of Brits across the EU led to a pan-European campaign, we retraced the early steps of the Votes for Life movement. Which led us to a near-centenarian British war veteran in a quaint Italian coastal town.

How a group of Brits took up a struggle for millions of their co-citizens: Part One
Harry Shindler reviews a document in his office and home in Porto d'Ascoli. Photo: Alex Macbeth.

Harry Shindler, 97, was part of the Allied landings in Anzio near Rome to liberate Italy from fascism in 1944. He eventually settled in the country, which he had first visited as a soldier, in 1982 with his wife and son. His campaign to get Brits abroad the vote has made him a legendary figure whose campaigning work inspired the citizens’ rights group British in Europe.

“So many Brits abroad have gotten involved. They’re all coming together,” Harry Shindler told The Local at his home in Porto d’Ascoli, on the Adriatic coast in Italy.

Jane Golding joined the campaign for the so-called votes for life' bill in 2011. The Berlin-based lawyer and co-chair of British in Europe – the grassroots campaign to secure the rights of Brits living in the EU – credits Shindler’s work on the votes for life bill as the genesis of the pan-European British rights campaign, a first movement of its kind by Brits spread across Europe.

If the Overseas Electoral Bill becomes law it could bring up to five million Brits back into the voting framework in the UK. At the moment, Brits who have lived outside of the UK for 15 years lose the right to vote – they become disenfranchised. In such a scenario, they can no longer participate in parliamentary elections nor in people’s votes, such as the highly-divisive Brexit referendum.

The Overseas Electoral Bill aims to change that. It has already survived two readings in parliament and cross-examination in four sittings in the House of Commons. It faces the third, and crucial, reading before the House of Commons on January 25th. The largest obstacle after that would likely be minor revisions at the House of Lords. 

“This is the last hurdle at the Commons,” Harry Shindler, surrounded by memorabilia from a life few can expect to live, told The Local. Shindler has been lobbying for overseas Brits to be re-enfranchised since he found out he couldn’t vote in UK parliamentary elections in 1997. That didn’t sit lightly with the sharp and engaged war veteran.

The Italian dictionary Harry Shindler MBE bought in southern Italy in 1943 before landing in Anzio, to fight fascism, in 1944. Photo: Alex Macbeth.

“The war 70 years ago was about bringing back the right of people to vote,” says Harry, who is the star of an award-winning film (currently on the festival circuit) – My war is not over.

In the documentary by Italian director Bruno Bigoni, Shindler recounts how he acts upon requests, often from family members, to find British soldiers lost in the WW2 Italian campaign. 

His method involves tracking down what happened to British soldiers in regimental war diaries, where a day's warfare was recorded in an hour-by-hour log. That’s how Shindler found out the truth about Corporal Waters, father of Pink Floyd singer Roger Waters. But that’s another story, documented in the book My war is not over by Italian journalist Marco Patucchi.

 
From a young age, this charming Londoner and colossal figure has chosen to engage in struggles. The campaigns that bear his mark are many: from lobbies for regulation of licensing houses, to defeating fascism or changing the British electoral system. In his office, one placard denotes he is a member of ANPI, the Italian partisan organisation. Another reminds visitors that Harry Shindler has been awarded the title Member of the British Empire (MBE); an honorary doctorate from the American University in Rome sits near a photo of Harry with Pink Floyd singer Roger Waters. 
 

Harry Shindler and Roger Waters at a ceremony to commemorate the British soldiers who served in Italy in World War Two and whose resting place in Italy, as well as their fate, remains unknown. Photo: Alex Macbeth. 

Should the Overseas Electoral Bill be approved in its final sitting in the House of Commons next month, only the House of Lords will stand between potentially millions of Brits abroad being able to register for UK elections via the last constituency where they lived in the UK.

Shindler has been instrumental in getting the bill this far, yet the votes for life bill has its heroes across Europe. The late Brian Cave, who together with former Conservative party staffer Roger Boaden also worked on the campaign to get Brits in France the winter fuel allowance, is another “long-term campaigner”. Cave was involved in the early stages of the votes for live movement, Boaden tells The Local. 

READ ALSO: Battling Brexit: How a group of Brits in Europe took on the fight for citizens' rights

Brian Cave authored a blog called Pensioners Debout in which he campaigned for many aspects affecting the lives of elderly British citizens in the EU, Boaden recalls of his friend who died in early 2018. “It's because of Brian that I got involved,” says Boaden. 

Boaden has been campaigning to ensure that pensioners in countries like France, Spain and Cyprus can receive the fuel allowance paid to economically vulnerable pensioners by the UK government. British pensioners who would normally be eligible for the allowance of between £100 and £300 (€110–330 approx) are denied the right in those countries based on studies by the Department for Working Pensions (DWP) that estimate the average winter temperatures in France are higher than in the UK.

Boaden, through a series of Freedom of Information (FOI) requests, has sought to prove that feasibility studies of the weather in some of those countries showed that certain areas were clearly colder than the UK. He claims the government manipulated the average temperatures in the UK and the affected countries, as well as the criteria for judging the UK hotter, than, say, France in winter.

 

Roger Boaden. Photo: ECREU. 

When the Brexit referendum happened in 2016, Boaden, Cave and others founded Expat Citizens Rights in the EU (ECREU), a group working on the rights of British citizens in France that counts 10,800 members.

“It was a natural evolution,” says Boaden. “We already had quite a lot of information on how people were suffering.” Across the EU, after the Brexit referendum, groups of Brits from different countries came together to form a movement of lawyers, spokespeople and grassroots campaigners. We'll be telling that chapter in Part Two of this story. 

One of the most unusual yet noteworthy facets of the volunteer movement of Brits lobbying EU28 governments to safeguard and ring-fence the rights of those on the front lines of Brexit, Brits in the EU, and EU citizens in the UK, is the non-political aspect.

Harry Shindler is a lifelong member of the Labour party, the same party Jane Golding used to work for; Roger Boaden worked for the Conservatives for 30 years. Other core British in Europe staff worked for the Liberal Democrats.

“What’s important is that it’s not party political,” Harry Shindler tells the Local from his flat in the Italian municipality that has made him an honorary citizen. “I’m working with a lot of Conservatives even though I’m not one,” he added.

Harry Shindler at home in Italy. Photo: Alex Macbeth. 

Boaden says the votes for life campaign has been unique in its cross-party ability to get Brits across Europe on the same page on an issue.

“At the core is the need to scrap the 15-year rule for overseas voters and rightly ensure that this group can vote for life,” Glyn Davies, the MP who presented the Bill to Parliament in 2017, said in the House of Commons’ first of four sittings on the bill in October and November.

But the Overseas Electoral Bill also has its critics.

The Labour Party has taken a lukewarm, if not opposition, stance to the bill. “The Bill as it stands would demand a hugely complex administrative task of our electoral registration officers,” Christian Matheson, a Labour MP for the City of Chester, argued in the House of Commons. Matheson cited budget cuts as a further reason to avoid giving the electoral commission more work.

“They’re putting administration before the right of people to vote,” Shindler, who will be at the House of Commons for the final reading on January 25th, tells The Local.

“I pointed out to them that by the same argument a city could reach a point where they stop people voting because they don’t have enough money,” says Shindler.

Harry Shindler with his honorary doctorate from the American University of Rome. Photo: Alex Macbeth. 

The votes for life campaign morphed into a broader movement in defence of the rights of citizens after June 23rd, 2016: the Brexit referendum.

What started with a handful of British campaigners has led to a powerful pan-European movement. That movement, under the leadership of the British in Europe umbrella group, is pushing to hold the British government, in light of Brexit, to account on the rights of British citizens living in Europe.

“The EU has given Europe 70 years of peace,” says Harry Shindler. He has been here for each one of them. And longer. Citing “dangerous” populists and the spectre of the 1930s looming over many parts of Europe, Shindler says the votes for life campaign is about “principle”.  

Part Two: Battling Brexit: How a group of Brits in Europe took on the fight for citizens' rights

Part Three: How Brexit and the fight for rights united Britons from across Europe

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TRAVEL NEWS

Passports: What are the post-Brexit rules for dual-nationals travelling in Europe?

People who have more than one citizenship often hold multiple passports, so what does this mean for crossing borders? Here's what you should know.

Passports: What are the post-Brexit rules for dual-nationals travelling in Europe?

For many readers of The Local, gaining citizenship of the country where they live helps them to feel more settled – but there are also travel benefits, including avoiding the long ‘non EU’ queue when coming back into the Schengen zone.

But this week the problems associated with travelling while holding dual citizenship came to light, leaving many people wondering what they should know when they are entering different countries.

Put simply – which passport should you use? And do you have to carry both with you?

Financial Times journalist Chris Giles tweeted that the UK Border Force “detained” his dual-national daughter while she was travelling from France into the UK with her German passport – and not her British one. 

He went on to say that UK border guards released his daughter. According to Giles, the border staff said she should have had both passports with her “and asked why she was travelling on her German one”.

The rules on dual-nationality have not changed, but now that the UK is not in the EU, there are strict rules on non-Brits who enter the country (and vice-versa) which has made it trickier for travel.

For instance, UK nationals receive a stamp in their passport when entering Schengen member states because they are only allowed to stay up to 90 days within an 180 period (unless they have a visa or residency card).

READ ALSO: Brexit: EU asks border police not to stamp passports of British residents 

People coming from the EU to the UK can generally visit as a tourist for up to six months without a visa – but are not allowed to carry out any work while there.

So which passport should you show?

The first thing to be aware of is there are no specific rules on travelling with more than one passport. 

Travellers can choose to use whichever passport they prefer when going to a country. 

But one thing to note is that it’s worth using the passport that is best suited to your destination when travelling there. Each country has its own set of immigration and visa rules that you’ll need to research closely.

It could be that one passport is better suited for your trip – and you may be able to avoid visa requirements.  

READ ALSO: How powerful is the German passport?

In the case of the UK, many people are still getting to grips with the different rules that apply because it’s not in the EU anymore.

A question submitted to the Secretary of State for the Home Department in September 2021 provided some insight into this issue. 

The question from Labour’s Paul Blomfield asked what steps the UK government “is taking to enable dual UK and EU citizens to travel to the UK on an EU member state passport without having to further prove their UK citizenship?”

The Conservatives Kevin Foster said: “Border Force Officers examine all arriving passengers to establish whether they are British citizens, whether they require leave to enter or if they are exempt from immigration control.

“Where the passenger claims to be British, but does not hold any evidence of British citizenship, the officer will conduct all relevant checks to satisfy themselves the passenger is British.

Border control at Hamburg airport.

Border control at Hamburg airport. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Christian Charisius

“When dual nationals who are eligible to use e-gates travel to the UK, they will enter via the e-gates without being examined by an immigration officer.

“We recommend all dual nationals, including EU citizens, travel on their British passport or with evidence or their British citizenship to minimise any potential delay at the border or when commencing their journey.”

The Local contacted the UK Home Office to ask if there was any official advice. 

A spokesman said: “An individual can present whichever passport they desire to enter the UK, however they will be subject to the entry requirements associated with the nationality of the passport they present.”

They said anyone who is looking for more information should check out guidance on entering the UK and on dual nationality.

In short, if you present a German passport on entry to the UK you will be treated the same as any other German citizen – which can include being quizzed about your reasons for visiting the UK – as border guards have no way of knowing that you are a dual-national. 

Do I have to carry both passports?

There’s no rule requiring you to have both passports, but you won’t get the benefits of a British passport (entry into the UK without questions) if you don’t show it.

Likewise if you are a French-British dual national and you enter France on your UK passport, you will need to use the non-EU queue and may have your passport stamped.

Should I think about anything else?

An important thing to remember is that if you apply for a visa and register your passport details, the same passport has to be used to enter the country. 

It could also make sense to travel with both passports, just in case. 

However, note that some countries – like the US – require that US nationals use a US passport to enter and leave the States even if they are dual nationals. 

In general, it’s best to use the same passport you entered a country with to depart.

The rules and systems are different depending on the country. But many countries require people to show their passport when leaving – and they will either stamp or scan the passport – this is how authorities know that a foreign visitor hasn’t overstayed their time in the country. 

So if your passport is checked as you leave the UK, you should show the one you arrived with, just to ensure there is a record of you arriving and leaving.

However as you enter France/Germany/other EU destination, you can show your EU passport in order to maximise the travel benefits of freedom of movement.

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