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Brexit road-tripper: ‘It has made me appreciate what Europe has to offer and what we have to lose’

Brit Andy Pardy quit his job to undertake an epic odyssey across Europe in order to write ‘Stop Brexit’ with the resulting GPS route. Having recently concluded his more than 35,000-kilometre journey across 27 European nations, The Local caught up again with ‘The rogue consultant’ and his ode to freedom of movement.

Brexit road-tripper: 'It has made me appreciate what Europe has to offer and what we have to lose'
Andy Pardy arrives at Trebarwith Strand in Cornwall after the first 1,522 kilometres of his epic journey. Photo: Andy Pardy

When we last spoke to Andy Pardy, he was in Greece and about to continue driving north, a route that would eventually spell the word ‘Brexit’ when displayed on a map with GPS coordinates. 

“For the letter ‘X’ I drove from Mt Olympus to Berlin, then onto the outskirts of Warsaw and back down into the Croatian mountains,” Pardy, now back in the UK, told The Local. The ‘X’ alone required a 3,036-kilometre drive. 

Pardy had already driven the route that would spell the word ‘Stop’ through the UK, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Scandinavia and the Baltic states. 

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Editor's note: Obviously the EU's freedom of movement is about a lot more than cross-border travel, which for Britons might soon mean more paperwork. Make sure to sign up for our Europe & You newsletter for a weekly digest of what's at stake as Britain gets closer to the exit. 

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The curious story of why this British management consultant decided to throw in his job in the UK and undertake a last European tour, armed with nothing but a Volkswagen van, a GPS tracker and a passion for Europe, has captivated the minds of media worldwide. 

“After the Brexit vote I felt powerless. I haven't been able to participate or assist and I just wanted to do something,” Pardy told The Local in September this year.

So Pardy decided to traverse the continent he has known since he was a child (he grew up in Germany) for what he labelled a ‘last European tour’ to highlight the privilege that is freedom of movement. 

The man with a van, who was joined by his girlfriend Katy for the latter part of the journey, saw mountain ranges in Scandinavia, Slovakia, Slovenia, France, Spain and Croatia, “so it was nice to see Mt. Blanc, Europe’s highest peak,” says Pardy. Katy was subjected to equivalent beauty. Her three-day birthday trip took in Lake Bled in Slovenia, Lake Iseo in Italy and Chamonix at the feet of Mt Blanc.

Yet the highlights were so many, says Pardy. Romania was “a hidden gem”; mountain ranges in Slovenia and Croatia revealed landscapes Pardy “had never imagined”; Scandinavia was full of charm too. He even managed to stop in Munich for Oktoberfest.

Pardy is the captain of the story although his van may well be the unsung hero. “It never broke down and never didn’t start,” says Pardy, even though the vehicle covered more than 900 kilometres on rough roads on tough days. 

Pardy’s journey took him through most of Europe’s mountain ranges. “I feel like I know Europe better,” says Pardy, who has criss-crossed 26-EU nations in the last three months, with some understatement. “I thought I knew Europe. Seeing some of the farthest-flung corners has shown me what Europe has to offer. Even though we don’t know to what extent freedom of movement will be curtailed, it is very clear what we stand to lose,” adds Pardy, whose journey has filled more than nine pages of Google with media clips, including this Arte documentary.

His journey may appear inherently political but Pardy says more than anything it was personal. “It wasn’t to stir division,” says Pardy, who has received hundreds, if not thousands of messages of support along his route. Despite sleeping in a tin van and living on a diet of tin cans, Pardy says every corner of Europe was worth it. 

Would he be willing to do it again if he’d made a typo? “I would do it all again tomorrow,” says Pardy, adding the caveat that he’d like to top up on fresh fruit and a few good nights of sleep before ever trying such an odyssey again. 

And the main lesson learnt? “The adventure has highlighted what is at stake,” says Pardy. 

You can learn more about Andy’s journey on his Instagram account

 

After 27 countries, 35,000 km and 45 stress-free EU border crossings, my Last European Tour is finally complete ???? • I have created a piece of #GPSart that covers 18,231.7km and spells two words; STOP BREXIT. The full route and gps records can be found attached (or at LocaToWeb.com – Search ‘The Rogue Consultant’) • Europe has exceeded all expectations. The support and kindness of all those met along the way, as well as the 1000s of messages received online has been mind-blowing. Thank you all ? • The right to explore as well as live and work abroad, without tiresome red tape, is an immense privilege. As it stands, the ability to freely access and roam our fellow EU member states makes us incredibly fortunate. For me, this adventure has highlighted what is at stake. • I’ve got a huge backlog of photos and videos to process and complete over the coming weeks. Stay tuned for blog updates! I’m also in the process of calculating and offsetting my CO2 emissions. • The final list of countries (in order of first entry) is as follows: UK ➡️ Republic of Ireland ➡️ France ➡️ Belgium ➡️ Netherlands ➡️ Germany ➡️ Denmark ➡️ Sweden ➡️ Norway (non-EU) ➡️ Finland ➡️ Estonia ➡️ Latvia ➡️ Lithuania ➡️ Poland ➡️ Slovakia ➡️ Hungary ➡️ Romania ➡️ Bulgaria ➡️ Greece ➡️ Austria ➡️ Czech Republic ➡️ Slovenia ➡️ Croatia ➡️ Italy ➡️ Luxembourg ➡️ Spain ➡️ Portugal #StopBrexit ??❤️?

A post shared by The Rogue Consultant (@therogueconsultant) on Oct 31, 2018 at 1:19am PDT

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Passports: What are the post-Brexit rules for dual-nationals travelling in Europe?

People who have more than one citizenship often hold multiple passports, so what does this mean for crossing borders? Here's what you should know.

Passports: What are the post-Brexit rules for dual-nationals travelling in Europe?

For many readers of The Local, gaining citizenship of the country where they live helps them to feel more settled – but there are also travel benefits, including avoiding the long ‘non EU’ queue when coming back into the Schengen zone.

But this week the problems associated with travelling while holding dual citizenship came to light, leaving many people wondering what they should know when they are entering different countries.

Put simply – which passport should you use? And do you have to carry both with you?

Financial Times journalist Chris Giles tweeted that the UK Border Force “detained” his dual-national daughter while she was travelling from France into the UK with her German passport – and not her British one. 

He went on to say that UK border guards released his daughter. According to Giles, the border staff said she should have had both passports with her “and asked why she was travelling on her German one”.

The rules on dual-nationality have not changed, but now that the UK is not in the EU, there are strict rules on non-Brits who enter the country (and vice-versa) which has made it trickier for travel.

For instance, UK nationals receive a stamp in their passport when entering Schengen member states because they are only allowed to stay up to 90 days within an 180 period (unless they have a visa or residency card).

READ ALSO: Brexit: EU asks border police not to stamp passports of British residents 

People coming from the EU to the UK can generally visit as a tourist for up to six months without a visa – but are not allowed to carry out any work while there.

So which passport should you show?

The first thing to be aware of is there are no specific rules on travelling with more than one passport. 

Travellers can choose to use whichever passport they prefer when going to a country. 

But one thing to note is that it’s worth using the passport that is best suited to your destination when travelling there. Each country has its own set of immigration and visa rules that you’ll need to research closely.

It could be that one passport is better suited for your trip – and you may be able to avoid visa requirements.  

READ ALSO: How powerful is the German passport?

In the case of the UK, many people are still getting to grips with the different rules that apply because it’s not in the EU anymore.

A question submitted to the Secretary of State for the Home Department in September 2021 provided some insight into this issue. 

The question from Labour’s Paul Blomfield asked what steps the UK government “is taking to enable dual UK and EU citizens to travel to the UK on an EU member state passport without having to further prove their UK citizenship?”

The Conservatives Kevin Foster said: “Border Force Officers examine all arriving passengers to establish whether they are British citizens, whether they require leave to enter or if they are exempt from immigration control.

“Where the passenger claims to be British, but does not hold any evidence of British citizenship, the officer will conduct all relevant checks to satisfy themselves the passenger is British.

Border control at Hamburg airport.

Border control at Hamburg airport. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Christian Charisius

“When dual nationals who are eligible to use e-gates travel to the UK, they will enter via the e-gates without being examined by an immigration officer.

“We recommend all dual nationals, including EU citizens, travel on their British passport or with evidence or their British citizenship to minimise any potential delay at the border or when commencing their journey.”

The Local contacted the UK Home Office to ask if there was any official advice. 

A spokesman said: “An individual can present whichever passport they desire to enter the UK, however they will be subject to the entry requirements associated with the nationality of the passport they present.”

They said anyone who is looking for more information should check out guidance on entering the UK and on dual nationality.

In short, if you present a German passport on entry to the UK you will be treated the same as any other German citizen – which can include being quizzed about your reasons for visiting the UK – as border guards have no way of knowing that you are a dual-national. 

Do I have to carry both passports?

There’s no rule requiring you to have both passports, but you won’t get the benefits of a British passport (entry into the UK without questions) if you don’t show it.

Likewise if you are a French-British dual national and you enter France on your UK passport, you will need to use the non-EU queue and may have your passport stamped.

Should I think about anything else?

An important thing to remember is that if you apply for a visa and register your passport details, the same passport has to be used to enter the country. 

It could also make sense to travel with both passports, just in case. 

However, note that some countries – like the US – require that US nationals use a US passport to enter and leave the States even if they are dual nationals. 

In general, it’s best to use the same passport you entered a country with to depart.

The rules and systems are different depending on the country. But many countries require people to show their passport when leaving – and they will either stamp or scan the passport – this is how authorities know that a foreign visitor hasn’t overstayed their time in the country. 

So if your passport is checked as you leave the UK, you should show the one you arrived with, just to ensure there is a record of you arriving and leaving.

However as you enter France/Germany/other EU destination, you can show your EU passport in order to maximise the travel benefits of freedom of movement.

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