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Supermarket with ‘secret source' of Nutella buckets strikes Germany's sweet tooth

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Supermarket with ‘secret source' of Nutella buckets strikes Germany's sweet tooth
Photo: DPA
17:32 CET+01:00
A supermarket in the west of Germany announced on social media at the weekend that it had started selling Nutella by the bucketload. The news has since spread like wildfire.

The Edeka supermarket in Neukirchen-Vluyn, a town near Duisburg in North Rhine-Westphalia decided to sell buckets of the chocolat -hazelnut spread after receiving repeated requests from customers.

“We like to try new things and to fulfil the wishes of our customers,” store manager Tobias Skiba told the Rheinische Post (RP) on Wednesday.

Initially they sold mini-jars of the spread which “were incredibly popular,” Skiba said.

So when customers asked if they could also sell Nutella in very large quantities, they looked into the possibilities.

But they couldn't get them through the normal Edeka delivery chains, meaning they had to ask a third-party supplier.

The supplier pulled through, and on Saturday the shop put 50 buckets of the sweet spread on sale, half of which have already been sold.

Skiba is keeping tight-lipped about who exactly the supplier is though.

“Another Edeka branch in Bochum has already asked us where we got the buckets from, but we are keeping that secret,” Skiba told the RP. “For miles around, we are the only shop where you can buy Nutella by the bucketload.”

The shop claims to be receiving enquiries from across the country. Meanwhile a Facebook post advertising the industrial quantities of the spread has been shared well close to 800 times.

SEE ALSO: 'They were like animals' - Nutella promo sparks 'riots' in French supermarkets

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