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GREECE

Greece frees German TV journalists

Greece on Saturday freed two German journalists who had been arrested at the border with Turkey for allegedly entering a restricted area, a judicial source said.

Greece frees German TV journalists
The German embassy in Athens, above, said the area had inadequate signposting. Photo: German Embassy, Athens
The pair, a 31-year-old man and a 33-year-old woman, were working for regional German television channel NDR on a documentary about refugees, the station said in a statement. It said they “accidentally entered the prohibited area” on Friday.
   
The station said that according to Germany's embassy in Athens, as well as local authorities, this type of incident occurs frequently as the prohibited area does not have sufficient signage or fencing.
 
The journalists were cleared by the court, as is often the case in such incidents. They had told the court that they had been reporting and were not aware the area was restricted.
   
The Evros river on the Greek border with Turkey has for years been a crossing point for migrants and refugees seeking to enter Europe. Many die in the attempt from the cold or by drowning.
   
Last week, Turkish troops arrested two Greek soldiers in the same area. The two men, who are on trial in Turkey, say they lost their way in poor weather and entered Turkish territory by mistake.

ANGELA MERKEL

German war crime payments debated in Greece

Greece's parliament on Wednesday began a debate on a resolution to demand the payment of German war crime reparations, an issue long disputed by Berlin.

German war crime payments debated in Greece
Angela Merkel and Alexis Tsipras in Greece in January. Photo: DPA

“These demands are always active. They were never set aside by Greece,” parliament chairman Nikos Voutsis told reporters this week.

The chamber is expected to approve later Wednesday, with cross-party support, a resolution calling on the government of Premier Alexis Tsipras “to take all the necessary diplomatic and legal steps to claim and fully satisfy all the demands of the Greek state stemming from World War I and World War II”.

A parliamentary committee last year determined that Germany owes Greece at least €270 billion for World War I damages and looting, atrocities and a forced loan during the Nazi occupation in World War II.

Reclaiming war reparations has been a campaign pledge by Tsipras since 2015. He faces multiple electoral challenges this year, with his party trailing in polls.

'Historical responsibility'

During a visit to Greece in January, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said her country “recognised its historical responsibility.”

SEE ALSO: Merkel says Germany recognizes responsibility for Nazi war crimes in Greece

“We recognize our historical responsibility. We know how much suffering we, as Germany in the time of Nazism, have brought to Greece,” she said.

In 2014, ex-president Joachim Gauck had also sought public forgiveness in the name of Germany from relatives of those murdered by the Nazis in the mountains of northern Greece.

But when it comes to actual payments, the German government has always insisted that the issue was settled in 1960 in a deal with several European governments.

Germany's government spokesman Steffen Seibert reiterated Wednesday that “the reparation issue is judicially and politically settled”. 

He said Berlin is doing “everything it can so Greece and Germany maintain good relations as friends and partners”. 

During the Greek economic crisis, there was further tension in Athens over draconian EU austerity and bailout terms seen to be imposed by Berlin hardliners.

Relations have improved over the last three years after Tsipras' government endorsed conditions linked to satisfying its creditors.

Tsipras and Merkel also worked closely on finding common ground on migration and Balkans security.

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