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One quarter of EU Blue Card holders in Germany from India: report

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One quarter of EU Blue Card holders in Germany from India: report
Manpreet Sing Bhuie, a scientific assistant at the Technical University in Chemnitz who's from India, speaking to Master's student Sowmya Alluru in 2014. Photo: DPA.
15:33 CET+01:00
The number of qualified professionals in Germany from countries such as India and China is on the rise, according to a media report published on Tuesday.

The Rheinische Post (RP) states in its report that about one in four specialists (22.8 percent) who come to Germany with the EU Blue Card are from India, followed by people from China, Russia, Ukraine and Syria.

At the end of 2016, 97,865 Indians were living in Germany, according to the Central Register of Foreigners (AZR). This figure was drastically lower nearly a decade ago; the number of Indians in Germany was only 42,495 in 2007.

READ ALSO: The five most common challenges Indians face in Germany

Since the EU Blue Card - a residence permit issued by an EU member state to professionals from non-EU/EEA countries - was introduced in 2013, the number of cards issued as work permits in Germany to people from various countries has steadily been on the increase.

In the first half of 2017 alone 11,023 cards were issued across the Bundesrepublik, RP reports, referencing data from the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF).

In 2016, this figure was 17,362 - an significant increase from a total of 11,290 cards handed out in 2013.

In order to be issued with a card, a person needs to fill two prerequisites: possession of a university degree and evidence of a binding job offer with an annual salary of at least €49,600. In the fields of mathematics, IT, natural sciences, medicine or engineering, one’s salary must be at least €38,888.

The card is initially valid for up to four years, but this can be extended. After 33 months of working in Germany, holders of an EU Blue Card can be granted a permanent settlement permit. Though this can be reduced to just 21 months with a B1 German language certificate.

SEE ALSO: Six things you need to get right when you first arrive in Germany

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