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These 3 German cities are in the world top 10 for expats

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These 3 German cities are in the world top 10 for expats
Marienplatz in Munich. Photo: DPA
11:21 CET+01:00
Germany swept the floor in a new survey of the best cities in the world to live in, with Munich the highest ranked of three German cities in the top ten.

The survey by Mercer put together a list of the 230 world cities with the best standard of living and rated Munich (4), Düsseldorf (6) and Frankfurt (7) all worthy of a place in the top ten.

With Berlin, Hamburg, Stuttgart and Nuremberg all also ranked in the top 25, no other country in the world had such a wealth of metropolises at the top of the tables.

Leipzig also made it into the top 100, coming in at place 60.

"In the top 20 or 30 places there is really very little difference between the cities, with all of them enjoying a very high standard of living,” Stefan Zwink, Mercer spokesperson in Germany, told The Local.

The German cities were generally marked out by top quality public infrastructure, living spaces and variety of leisure activities, he explained.

What edged Munich above the other cities in the Bundesrepublik (Federal Republic) was the quality of its airport and its public transport system, Zwink noted.

Of the other major world economies, the first city to appear on the list was San Francisco on the west coast of the USA which was ranked at number 28.

Generally European cities dominated the top of the charts, with Vienna being chosen as the city with the best quality of living in the world.

Of the top ten cities, European cities took seven of the places, while also dominating a separate list of the safest cities in the world.

The Mercer survey is conducted to inform companies on how best to compensate employees when they send them on foreign assignments, the company says.

“Heightened domestic and global security threats, population displacement resulting from violence, and social unrest in key business centres around the world are all elements adding to the complex challenge facing multinational companies when analysing the safety and health of their expatriate workforces,” said Ilya Bonic, Senior Partner and president of Mercer’s Talent business.

“Multinational companies need accurate data and objective methods to determine the cost implications of deteriorating living standards and personal safety issues when compensating expatriates,” he added.

DON'T MISS: Munich airport streaks ahead of Berlin with driverless trains

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