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How I enjoy the early German spring

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How I enjoy the early German spring
Photo: DPA
12:40 CET+01:00
It is the most glorious weather. Fifteen degrees (sixteen some days!) sunny, blue skies. The park's grass is green and gold and purple and white, all the bulbs arriving early after a mild winter and what seems like an early spring.

Strawberries are in the supermarkets, half a kilo for 99 cents. Strawberries always mean good things in this part of the world. 

Although, I am always cautious to celebrate good weather in March, because after March comes April and as we all know, April macht was er will (April, does what it wants). And last year it snowed in April. So, you know, low hopes can’t be dashed.

On Sunday we went into town, along with the rest of Weiden (Bavaria), to do as the Germans do and flood the cafes’ outdoor seating (and ice cream shops – the queues were enormous).

The sun was warm, too warm for jackets, yet all the Germans sat comfortably in their big winter coats and scarves, as if they knew something about the weather we didn’t, that snow was going to fall any second.

I was daring and slipped my jacket off, exposing my clavicle. Exposed clavicles and ankles in months that are not between May and September, warrant stares, and I received a few from swaddled fellow patrons. It was the only thing stopping me taking my cardigan off and going the whole hog with bare arms.

Liv Hambrett is an Australian blogger and writer and has lived all over Germany. Her current home is Weiden, Bavaria. You can read more from her blog here. Check out Liv’s book, ‘What I know about Germans’.

Expat Dispatches is a weekly post from an English-language blogger or writer in Germany. It covers everything from lifestyle and food to history and culture. Email news@thelocal.com to have your blog considered for publication.

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