Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Knut autopsy 'most in-depth' in animal world

Share this article

Knut autopsy 'most in-depth' in animal world
Knut died suddenly aged four. Photo: DPA
10:27 CET+01:00
German zoologists have released celebrity polar bear Knut's autopsy results almost three years after his death. It was the most in-depth post-mortem ever carried out on an animal.

It has been public knowledge for some time that Knut had inflammation of the brain – encephalitis – which caused him to fall into the water in his Berlin enclosure and drown.

The complete autopsy, released on Friday, revealed that the the damage to his brain was so severe that even had he had not have fallen into the water and drowned he would have died anyway.

Experts at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) confirmed that he was suffering from a virus which caused the encephalitis.

Exactly which virus it was remains a mystery, but the IZW did rule out that Knut had equine-herpes – a popular theory since his death on March 19th 2011.

“An animal's death has never been so thoroughly investigated,” IZW animal pathologist Claudia Szentiks said. Experts from the University of California and from Berlin's Free University were also involved in the post-mortem.

The full report has been published in the Journal of Comparative Pathology. Szentiks said that it went far beyond an autopsy write-up, but “reached brand new realms of research," the Welt am Sonntag newspaper reported.

Those working on Knut's case are convinced that their work will provide important information about understanding illnesses among zoo animals.

CLICK HERE for photos of Knut

READ MORE: Knut's real fur used for museum statue

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular articles

Advertisement
Advertisement