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Police stumped by Bahlsen biscuit mystery

The Local · 26 Jan 2013, 11:49

Published: 26 Jan 2013 11:49 GMT+01:00

Both police and the Bahlsen managers are stumped by the theft of the biscuit-shaped logo, which has hung on the building untouched since 1913.

"We don't know. Anything is possible," a company spokeswoman said on Friday. "We're completely shocked."

Company chairman Werner M. Bahlsen has put up a reward of €1,000 for any information leading to the recovery. Incredibly, however, the investigation has been made more difficult by the fact that no-one knows exactly when the biscuit was stolen.

One Bahlsen worker reported seeing the biscuit three days into the New Year, but it was only reported missing last Monday.

What is clear is that the operation could not have been easy. The biscuit weighs 20 kilos, is about 50cm tall, and is suspended at a height of some five metres inside a large pretzel between two bronze men. The thief or thieves must have used a long ladder, or have been adept climbers.

"You can't just put it under your arm," said the spokeswoman.

On top of that, Bahlsen's headquarters are on a busy road where cars pass virtually 24 hours a day. Around 250 employees also regularly enter and leave the building.

The motive also remains a mystery - the logo, part of a facade sculpture, is not made of real gold, but gold-plated bronze, worth about €100 if sold for scrap. Bahlsen would not say how much the logo is actually worth. "We can't say anything about its material value," the spokeswoman said. "It's sentimental value is what counts for us, and that is high."

Story continues below…

The Local/DPA/bk

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

15:03 January 26, 2013 by Englishted
Well that takes the biscuit as they say.

Sorry
17:28 January 26, 2013 by Wrench
I have a suspect.....Cookie Monster!
19:01 January 26, 2013 by Englishted
Oh crumbs .

Really sorry.
20:14 January 26, 2013 by Brint
Whoever went all that trouble to take something of so little value must have been crackers.
20:37 January 26, 2013 by Tonne
Two men in boiler suits and hard hats with an extension ladder and no-one would give them a second glance. The spokeswoman may find it difficult but a 500 mm high sign weighing 20 kg is something that could be tucked under an arm.
08:49 January 27, 2013 by coffeelover
Just follow the trail of crumbs.
04:40 January 29, 2013 by berfel
Are they sure that they didn't send it away for cleaning?
09:31 January 29, 2013 by Tonne
The obvious suspects are Garibaldi and his ginger nut girlfriend Marie. Garibaldi simply couldn't stomach Bahlsen hobnobbing with the Bourbons and enjoying the rich tea life. He was so angry that his morning coffee upset his digestive system. He would have been better drinking malted milk. Although stealing the sign was not nice, it was great sport and soothed the chocolate chip on his shoulder. He was a jammy dodger and didn't give a fig roll. Those who saw him afterwards said that he was like te cat that had got the custard cream.
00:28 January 31, 2013 by RainerL
Ha, ha! Are some of you funny. Perhpas it would be better to realize what sort of Society we live in with such attitudes as yours. Today some would flogg off your little Toddler if he was not nailed to the Ground. would you make fun of that too in saying that perhaps (Kinder sache)? I certainly do not think this to be a funny thing. They are Scum in my Eyes and deserve to be flogged on the backside instead of a slap on the wrist if caught.

Little Value one has mentioned. Not so. If it is made of Copper it has great value. Lets face it; It;s a sad World we live in. Glad I won't be around after 30 years. hate to see what it will be like then. I guess Everyone going amok, Gangs and all.
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