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FOOTBALL

Löw hopes team will learn from 2012 mistakes

The past year was a mixed one for Germany’s national football team coach Joachim Löw, as the man known as “Super Jogi” was wide praised in the first half of 2012 but blamed for many mishaps after that.

Löw hopes team will learn from 2012 mistakes
Photo: DPA

Löw told Die Welt daily on Monday that 2013 will “be a year of concentration, maybe also of experimentation and of preparation for the World Cup in 2014.” He acknowledged that the German national team is “very young and the learning curve has not been reached yet. That means the players will gain important additional experience.”

Löw came in for lots of criticism following Germany’s summer defeat in the European Cup semi-final against Italy and after tying a World Cup qualifying game against Sweden after the Germans were winning 4-0 after 60 minutes of play.

Löw said something like that “cannot happen again” and blamed not only the team’s youthfulness, but also on not sticking to tactics, failing to concentrate on the team’s strength and not being consistent after strong performances in the beginning of the year.

But the national coach was annoyed at some of the criticism following games against Italy and Sweden.

“When all of a sudden it’s about whether we pamper the players too much or whether we have to go back to our German traits in the traditional sense” – that bothers me. “We never let go of them.”

Löw said fighting and engaging in the game are basic requirements, but he considers “creativity” to also be a German trait.

The coach said he was personally affected by the massive criticism and also felt some of it was very unfair, which is why he chose to speak out about it in a press conference in August.

Asked whether he thought about throwing in the towel and quitting, Löw said, “No way, even with all the criticism. It so happens that we have set the bar very high due to our good performances over the last years. A defeat can put us into a situation like we experienced with the Euro. But you have to be able to deal with that.

“I knew that after the game with Italy it would be tough. We were all disappointed and the emotions were strong. But you have to push through that.”

Löw said if he couldn’t deal with that and ended up having to question everything after a defeat then he’d have real problems acting as the national trainer.

Asked how he would prevent such repeat performances, Löw said the team would be working on one or the other scenarios, but admitted that it’s impossible to simulate everything that could happen on the pitch. The defeats could however help the team.

“2012 was a year of learning,” he said. “Now everyone had to take the right consequences from that.”

The Local/mw

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FOOTBALL

British football teams allowed to skip Germany’s quarantine for Euro 2020

Germany's government announced on Tuesday it will allow England, Scotland and Wales to enter the country without quarantine to play at Euro 2020 despite a recent rise in cases linked to the Delta variant of Covid-19 in Britain.

British football teams allowed to skip Germany's quarantine for Euro 2020
One of the venues for Euro 2020 is in Munich. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Sven Hoppe

The three teams could potentially reach the quarter-final held in Munich on July 2nd.

If that were the case, they would be exempt from the rule that travellers from the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland must currently observe a 14-day isolation period due to the virus strain of concern – Delta – first identified in India.

“The people accredited for the European football Championship are exempt from the quarantine obligation, even after arriving from an area impacted by a variant” Berlin said in a statement.

“This exemption concerns all the people who have been accredited by the organising committee for the preparation, participation, the holding and the follow-up of international sporting events,” it added.

The exemption does not include fans, who will be obliged to follow German government self-isolation rules.

Germany declared the UK a ‘virus variant area of concern’ on May 23rd due to rising cases linked to the Delta variant in parts of the country. 

READ ALSO: Germany makes UK ‘virus variant area of concern’: How does it affect you?

This reclassification came just seven days after the UK was put back on Germany’s list at the lowest risk level, and barely a month after it was taken off all risk lists completely.

The ban was put in place despite the UK’s relatively low Covid rates as a precautionary measure.

A general ban on entry is in place for people coming from countries on the ‘virus variant’ list – such as India and Brazil – the highest of Germany’s risk categories. 

There are some exceptions for entering from these countries – for example German residents and citizens. However, anyone who does enter from Germany is required to submit a Covid-19 test before boarding the flight and must quarantine for 14 days on arrival, regardless of whether they are fully vaccinated or not.

READ ALSO: Germany’s new relaxed quarantine and testing rules after travel

Euro 2020 starts on Friday as Italy host Turkey in Rome with the Bavarian city hosting three group games as well as the last-eight match.

Around 14,000 fans will be allowed into the Allianz Arena for the fixtures.

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