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FRANKFURT

What’s on in Germany: July 5 – 11

This week’s highlights: Open-air classics in Berlin, Senti Swing in Frankfurt and a Woodie Guthrie musical in Munich.

What's on in Germany: July 5 - 11
Photo: Les Yeux d'la Tete

BERLIN

Concerts

Classic Open Air 2012

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the much-beloved outdoor classical music series, taking place in one of Europe’s most breathtaking plazas, Gendarmenmarkt. Flanked by the Konzerthaus, the Deutscher Dom and the Französischer Dom, the concerts never fail to delight audiences, whether seated in the stands or meandering around the perimeter of the plaza. Five nights of spell-binding music under the stars are scheduled into this year’s program.

Price: €39.50 – 89.50

Location: Gendarmenmarkt, 10117 Berlin

Times: July 5 – 9, doors open 6pm, concerts begin 7:30pm

More Information: Classic Open Air 2012 Website

Art

Europe (to the power of) n

This trans-regional art project examines the cultural nature of Europe based on its inherent diversity. It supposes that, while challenges arise, Europe is well poised to open up to the rest of the world, thanks especially to its unique experience with community, forms of social organization and the resulting friction. The exhibition will travel to nine cities in and outside of Europe including Brussels, Istanbul, London, Minsk, Novi Sad, Høvikodden/Oslo, San Sebastián, and Beijing. It opens Friday in Berlin.

Price: Free

Location: Haus der Kulturen der Welt, John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10, 10557 Berlin

Times: July 6 -7, begins 6pm

More Information: Europe (to the power of) n Website

Cinema

Open-Air: My Week with Marilyn

Summer means open-air cinema in Kreuzberg, and this Thursday Colin Clark tells of his week with Marilyn Monroe. The story chronicles his time as a 23-year-old film assistant who comes face-to-face with Marilyn on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl. When her new husband Arthur Miller leaves her alone in England for a week, Colin has the chance to show her an idyllic side of England, simultaneously revealing her desperation to escape the pressures of a Hollywood-driven existence.

Price: €6.50

Location: Open-Air Cinema Kreuzberg (across from Adalbertstr. 73) 10997 Berlin

Times: July 6, show starts doors open 6pm, concerts begin 7:30pm

More Information: Open Air Cinema Kreuzberg Website

COLOGNE

Cinema

Classic Films from Africa: Microphone

Film Initiative Cologne is presenting a series of 20 important African cinematic achievements this summer from May through September. On Thursday, Microphone will offer audiences an impression of the alternative music scene in the Egyptian port city of Alexandria. Not long after the film’s completion in 2010, the city found itself in the international spotlight as an important centre of resistance against Mubarak’s unpopular regime. The film will be shown in Arabic with English subtitles.

Price: €6.50, €5 discounted

Location: Filmhaus Köln, Maybachstr. 111, 50670 Cologne

Time: June 5, 7:30pm

More Information: Film Initiative Website

FRANKFURT

Concert

Les Yeux d’la Tete

Touted as “crazy, poetic gypsy-punk from Paris”, the six members of Les Yeux d’la Tete are known to appear in Parisian metro stations and on canal banks to share their passion for musical fusion with everyone around. In a warm up to their appearance at the Rudolstadt Festival, the “Senti-Swing” sextet are making a stop at the Brotfabrik this Thursday, no doubt to the delight of fans of Hurlements d’Léo and LéOparleur, with whom the French music troupe are often compared.

Price: €10-13

Location: Brotfabrik, Bachmanstr. 2-4, 60488 Frankfurt

Time: July 5, 8pm

More Information: Brotfabrik Website

GIENGEN AN DER BRENZ

Festivals

7th Steiff Summer

The classic German-made bears that have captured the imaginations of children and adults the world over are celebrating a festival for the seventh time. The Steiff Museum in Giengen an der Brenz is opening the childhood home of Steiff company founder Margarete Steiff to visitors. The highlight of Steiff Summer is a special auction, which takes place in the evening on Saturday and attracts fans from all over the world to the original home of the classic teddy bear treasures.

Price: €10, kids under 18 €5, kids under 6 free

Location: Steiff Museum, Margarete-Steiff-Platz 1, 89537 Giengen an der Brenz

Time: July 6 (10am – 7pm) to July 8 (10am – 11pm)

More Information: Steiff Event Brochure

LUDWIGSBURG

Concert

Gärten des Blühenden Barock Musikfeuerwerk

What would summer be without classical music coupled with a fireworks extravaganza? Ten thousand lights will set the mood for the first part of this classical Baroque concert in the heart of the “Garden of Blooms”. Then, a fireworks finale will accompany the final 20 minutes of the show, impeccably timed to the music. Specialists from Flash-Art in Bielefeld are responsible for design and execution of the magnificently co-ordinated display.

Price: €10, kids €5

Location: Mömpelgardstraße 28 – 71640 Ludwigsburg

Time: July 7, concert begins 7pm, fireworks begin 10:30pm

More Information: Gärten des Blühenden Website

MUNICH

Musical Theatre

Woody Sez – The Life And Music of Woody Guthrie

This musical theatre interpretation of the life and music of Woodie Guthrie takes its name from the column in the communist newspaper for which he used to write every week in the 1930s. Four actors equipped with the typical folk-instrument array including guitars, banjos and fiddles portray the musician’s life from bouts of foolishness to his lyrical genius as well as his political entanglements. In the spirit of one of Guthrie’s own quotes, the show “just wants to be known as the man who told you something you already knew.”

Price: €14, €10 discounted

Location: Amerika Haus, Karolinenplatz 3, 80333 Munich

Times: July 10, 8pm

More Information: Amerika Haus Website

Concerts

Classical Music on Odeonsplatz

Classical Music on Odeonsplatz has wowed audiences for an entire weekend in July since the year 2000. More than 16,000 visitors descend upon one of Munich’s most beautiful squares to indulge in world-class performances by two of the city’s best orchestras, the Munich Philharmonic and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. This year’s program will include world-famous Argentinian cellist Sol Gabetta on Saturday and the young star conductor Andris Nelsons on Sunday.

Price: €5.50-45.50

Location: Odeonplatz, 80539 Munich

Time: July 7 – 8, 8pm

More Information: Classical Music on Odeonplatz Website

Festivals

Chinese Culture Week

The Chinese language and culture institute Konfuzius München is organizing an opportunity for anyone from school children to adult intellectuals to explore various aspects of Chinese culture. With talks on everything from traditional Chinese medicine to calligraphy, food safety to depictions of China in the German media, there’s something for everyone to mull over. The organization also offers open readings and group study on Confucianism the first Friday of every month from 6:30 to 8:30pm.

Price: (various)

Location: Tee-Pavillon am Münchner Rindermarkt, Munich

Time: July 7 – 11, 9am – 10pm

More Information: Konfuzius München Website

STUTTGART

Festivals

Summer Festival of Culture 2012

Stuttgart’s Summer Festival of Culture has it all including food, culture and plenty of music. The city’s Stuttgarter Migrantenverein has organized the event as a celebration of diversity, with the state of Baden-Württemberg joining in to support an important anniversary year. Some 26% of the state’s population comes from a migratory background, officials point out, making the festival all the more relevant. Headliners include the “voice of the Arab Spring” Emel Mathlouthi and acts such as Toto La Momposina, who come from as far away as Colombia.

Price: (varying & free)

Location: Marktplatz, 70173 Stuttgart

Time: July 10 – 15, 5:30pm-10pm & various times

More Information: Forum of Cultures Stuttgart Website

For members

BERLIN

EXPLAINED: Berlin’s latest Covid rules

In response to rapidly rising Covid-19 infection rates, the Berlin Senate has introduced stricter rules, which came into force on Saturday, November 27th. Here's what you need to know.

A sign in front of a waxing studio in Berlin indicates the rule of the 2G system
A sign in front of a waxing studio indicates the rule of the 2G system with access only for fully vaccinated people and those who can show proof of recovery from Covid-19 as restrictions tighten in Berlin. STEFANIE LOOS / AFP

The Senate agreed on the tougher restrictions on Tuesday, November 23rd with the goal of reducing contacts and mobility, according to State Secretary of Health Martin Matz (SPD).

He explained after the meeting that these measures should slow the increase in Covid-19 infection rates, which was important as “the situation had, unfortunately, deteriorated over the past weeks”, according to media reports.

READ ALSO: Tougher Covid measures needed to stop 100,000 more deaths, warns top German virologist

Essentially, the new rules exclude from much of public life anyone who cannot show proof of vaccination or recovery from Covid-19. You’ll find more details of how different sectors are affected below.

Shops
If you haven’t been vaccinated or recovered (2G – geimpft (vaccinated) or genesen (recovered)) from Covid-19, then you can only go into shops for essential supplies, i.e. food shopping in supermarkets or to drugstores and pharmacies.

Many – but not all – of the rules for shopping are the same as those passed in the neighbouring state of Brandenburg in order to avoid promoting ‘shopping tourism’ with different restrictions in different states.

Leisure
2G applies here, too, as well as the requirement to wear a mask with most places now no longer accepting a negative test for entry. Only minors are exempt from this requirement.

Sport, culture, clubs
Indoor sports halls will off-limits to anyone who hasn’t  been vaccinated or can’t show proof of recovery from Covid-19. 2G is also in force for cultural events, such as plays and concerts, where there’s also a requirement to wear a mask. 

In places where mask-wearing isn’t possible, such as dance clubs, then a negative test and social distancing are required (capacity is capped at 50 percent of the maximum).

Restaurants, bars, pubs (indoors)
You have to wear a mask in all of these places when you come in, leave or move around. You can only take your mask off while you’re sat down. 2G rules also apply here.

Hotels and other types of accommodation 
Restrictions are tougher here, too, with 2G now in force. This means that unvaccinated people can no longer get a room, even if they have a negative test.

Hairdressers
For close-contact services, such as hairdressers and beauticians, it’s up to the service providers themselves to decide whether they require customers to wear masks or a negative test.

Football matches and other large-scale events
Rules have changed here, too. From December 1st, capacity will be limited to 5,000 people plus 50 percent of the total potential stadium or arena capacity. And only those who’ve been vaccinated or have recovered from Covid-19 will be allowed in. Masks are also compulsory.

For the Olympic Stadium, this means capacity will be capped at 42,000 spectators and 16,000 for the Alte Försterei stadium. 

Transport
3G rules – ie vaccinated, recovered or a negative test – still apply on the U-Bahn, S-Bahn, trams and buses in Berlin. It was not possible to tighten restrictions, Matz said, as the regulations were issued at national level.

According to the German Act on the Prevention and Control of Infectious Diseases, people have to wear a surgical mask or an FFP2 mask  on public transport.

Christmas markets
The Senate currently has no plans to cancel the capital’s Christmas markets, some of which have been open since Monday. 

According to Matz, 2G rules apply and wearing a mask is compulsory.

Schools and day-care
Pupils will still have to take Covid tests three times a week and, in classes where there are at least two children who test positive in the rapid antigen tests, then tests should be carried out daily for a week.  

Unlike in Brandenburg, there are currently no plans to move away from face-to-face teaching. The child-friendly ‘lollipop’ Covid tests will be made compulsory in day-care centres and parents will be required to confirm that the tests have been carried out. Day-care staff have to document the results.

What about vaccination centres?
Berlin wants to expand these and set up new ones, according to Matz. A new vaccination centre should open in the Ring centre at the end of the week and 50 soldiers from the German army have been helping at the vaccination centre at the Exhibition Centre each day since last week.

The capacity in the new vaccination centre in the Lindencenter in Lichtenberg is expected to be doubled. There are also additional vaccination appointments so that people can get their jabs more quickly. Currently, all appointments are fully booked well into the new year.

 

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