• Germany's news in English
 
app_header_v3

Kohl says Merkel is 'ruining' Europe

The Local · 17 Jul 2011, 13:11

Published: 17 Jul 2011 13:11 GMT+02:00

News magazine Der Spiegel reported Sunday that Kohl told a recent visitor to his home, "She's ruining my Europe" - referring Merkel's handling of the ongoing euro crisis, and to his own part in developing the European Union and laying the foundation for the single currency.

Other prominent members of Merkel's Christian Democratic Union (CDU) have also criticized their leader. Volker Bouffier, state premier of Hesse and CDU deputy leader, recently said the chancellor was in danger of destroying her party's pro-European heritage. "Europe is a political project. It's too important to leave to the ratings agencies," he told Der Spiegel.

"The last thing that an export country like Germany can afford is a euro-sceptic population," added Kurt Lauk, the head of the CDU's economic council. "The government must go on the offensive now."

Merkel is fast gaining a euro-sceptic reputation because she is seen as blocking a solution to the debt crisis. She recently threatened not to attend a summit of government leaders, planned for Thursday, unless a second aid package for Greece would be agreed there.

Merkel is currently under attack from all directions. The head of the German Bundesbank Jens Weidmann told Die Zeit newspaper last week that the government lacked a clear strategy for dealing with the snowballing debt crisis in the eurozone.

And Dutch Finance Minister Jan Kees de Jager has also called for the chancellor to show more leadership.

Merkel was accused of "euro-populism" earlier this year, when she criticized the pension and work conditions in Mediterranean countries, and implied the populations there did not do enough work.

Story continues below…

The Local/bk

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

17:22 July 17, 2011 by Englishted
Oh dear she can't do right for wrong at the moment only one answer :

GO.
19:32 July 17, 2011 by vonSchwerin
Is it possible that Merkel is right and wrong at the same time?

On the one hand, she isn't doing enough to foster a sense of European solidarity and to stabilize the Euro. On the other hand, the pensions and the work conditions of some Mediterranean countries are part of the problem.
20:28 July 17, 2011 by JG_London
Chancellor Merkel's situation appears a perilous one requiring a sensitive, well-considered approach.

While the strength of Germany's economy could, to a large extent, stabilise the struggling economies of the Eurozone, what would be the longer term reaction of German tax-payers? Should the levels of euro-sceptism witnessed in some EU nations take hold in Germany, the EU's economic bedrock, this would arguably have far greater long term consequences for Europe's economic and political future than Merkel's moves to negotiate a wider range of contributors to the bailout of various Eurozone countries, despite the delays in finding a solution this may cause.

There are some in western German who still grumble about the cost of rescuing the eastern German economy over the last two decades; how much louder would such grumbles grow if German tax payers now felt they were (virtually) alone in re-establishing the economic viability of a significant proportion of the Eurozone?
23:02 July 17, 2011 by olog-hai
Wow, the same Kohl who said "(t)he future will belong to the Germans . . . when we build the house of Europe", now complaining that Merkel isn't doing what he wants to *his* Europe? And all the trouble he went to, beginning with starting the war in Bosnia and all. Pity that strong leaders like Theodore Roosevelt and Winston Churchill aren't around anymore . . . sure would love to hear what they'd have to say to Kohl.
23:17 July 17, 2011 by Redwing
This story remind me of the difficult relationship between Edward Heath and his successor, Margaret Thatcher. Some people just can't let let go, especially when a woman is in charge.
23:18 July 17, 2011 by wenddiver
No Country willingly gives up it's soveignty. Scotland lost it to Great Britain over debt, Texas became part of the US trying to get them to pay off the debt of te Republic of Texas, and the New England States had their debt from the American Revolution Federalised and paid off by the Southern States.

So why is anybody surprised that Germany is going to have to pay off everybody's bills???
00:37 July 18, 2011 by nemo999
Texas entry in to the United States, was planned by Andrew Jackson, completed by James Polk, and executed by Sam Houston. Sam Houston was a protege of Jackson and Polk. James Polk was a protege of Jackson. All three of these individual held positions advocating the entry of the Republic of Texas into the Union. Much of the financing of the Republic was from interest in the United States. In Texas on of the primary reasons given for the entry of the Republic of Texas in the Union, was the belief in the Republic that the Army of Texas would not be able to stand against the french inspired reconstitution of the Mexican Army. It was felt that the Army of the United States would be more than a match for the Mexican Army. The Mexican American war, was started via an incident in South Texas. The United States Army defeated the Mexican Army. Texas position in the Union was preserved, and the Mexican Government was forced to renounce any all claims to Texas and other territories (California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado) via the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The Republic of Texas debts did become those of the United States, but it was a pretty good deal for the United States since much of it was owed to the United States.
01:41 July 18, 2011 by wenddiver
@Nemo- There is no doubt that certain members of the US Government wanted Texas from day one. Many Americans thought East Texas was part of the Louisiana purchase, since it was part of the Spanish Colony (that included West Florida that also became a Republic) that France took from Spain to sell to the US. Many were horrified when Texasbecame part of Mexico and trade between Louisiana and Texas via the Spanish trail was interrupted.

The US supported the infant Mexican Republic, up until they made Santa Anna Dictator and he started buying weaponry from the European Powers. War was only a matter of time and Americans pored into Texas. Some like the New Orleans Greys that defended the Alamo and the Mississippi and Tennessee Voluteers that made up so much of the Army of "Texas" came as already formed Military Units. The destruction of Mexico's US inspired first constitution by the Dictator Santa Anna had turned large sections of Northern Mexico, Texas (Anglo and Mexican) and trade partners in the US against the governmentof Mexico. The US executed what was probably the most successful covert military operation in history by releasing lots of surplus arms onto the market in New Orleans, and sending actual Military leaders like Sam Houston into Texas. It is no accident that Sam Houston tried to draw Santa Anna North as it extended the Mexican Armies supply lines while shortening his US lines.

In the end the US errr I mean Texas won. The debate in Congress was over paying the Republic of Texas's debts and whether Texas would enter as one state or several, or a Free state or Slave. The US paid Texas's debt off, accepted her as one State (so there would not be lots of new Southernors as Senators) and clipped a small piece of the top to appease the states that oppossed Slavery.
17:36 July 18, 2011 by Englishted
Everything is big in Texas apart from G.W.Bush's brain.
16:16 July 19, 2011 by jmclewis
Kohl is right these bailout are of no help to anyone. The weak must reform to rational policy.
16:54 July 21, 2011 by Raycr
Merkel does not want Germany to be Europe's piggy bank and she knows Germans are ticked off over all the bailouts. When Southern European countries pay their full income tax as the Germans do and retire at the same age as the Germans do then complain.

The bailouts give the appearance of letting the private investors get out their money out while replacing it with taxpayers money .

Did you see the Athens article in the BBC that had Greece requiring property owners in Athens to report their swimming pools for property tax purposes.

They did an aerial search later and found only 40% reported their pools. It is still considered a badge of honor even for highly paid professionals not to pay their full income tax.

It is time to have the Euro split into 2 zones with a little Euro in the PIIGS.
14:49 July 24, 2011 by Bishopbayern
wenddiver you talk aload of cobblers. Scotland signed the act of union to join the UK, get your facts right before you mouth off bollox. Good on angela she is doing the right thing and Kohl is a dreamer and was never good with the little details like the economy, just look at the mess of re-unification thanks to it being a rush job.
19:23 July 25, 2011 by wenddiver
@Bishopbayern- Sorry, but the people of Scotland never voted on any such thing. The Political Joining of the Scotland and England was arranged by commissioners who were actually paid for it, allegedly for loss of Offices, but several had not held office foor years.

England actually paid an additional 398,085 Pounds Sterling to Scotland and fixed her debts, if I remember correctly over half of the Articles are Financial articles.

Scotland had financially wrecked herself with the plan to put a Colony on the Istumus of Panama.

To quote Robert Burns "We were bought and sold for English gold." What Lord Belhaven called it wasn't as nice.

We have our own example of an equally silly merger in the US, that wasn't Federal.

If you walk across the Brooklyn bridge from Manhattan you will be amazed. Several of the old buildings of Brooklyn were quite oppulent , before the turn of the century (when Brooklyn was America's second biggest city.. After Union with New York City power shifted and now the difference is stark. There is only one number one, you never have multiple Capitals for long.
Today's headlines
VW to pay US suppliers $1.2 bln over Dieselgate
Volkswagen model vehicles on a dealer lot in Bedford, Massachusetts, USA. Photo: Cj Gunther/Picture Alliance/DPA

German auto giant Volkswagen has agreed to pay US suppliers $1.2 billion to settle claims emanating from the "Dieselgate" pollution scandal, the firm and suppliers said late Friday.

This Week in History
75 years since one of Holocaust's worst massacres
Photo: DPA

On Thursday, German president Joachim Gauck spoke in Kiev 75 years after the Nazis slaughtered 33,771 Jews during one of the worst single massacres of the Holocaust.

Six things you need to know about troubled Deutsche Bank

Shares in Deutsche bank plunged on Friday morning, dragging down other European banks and markets worldwide. Here are six things to know about Germany's biggest lender.

Deutsche Bahn jacks up prices for first time in 3 years
Photo: DPA

Germany's main rail provider, the state-owned Deutsche Bahn (DB), announced on Friday that it will raise prices on long-distance train travel.

Baby found alive in suitcase with skeleton in Hanover
File photo: DPA.

A baby has been found alive, along with the skeleton of another infant inside of a suitcase in Hanover, police reported on Friday.

Morocco to speed up repatriation of illegal migrants
Photo: DPA

Morocco has agreed to streamline the procedures for the repatriation of citizens living illegally in Germany, the royal court said late on Thursday.

890,000 refugees arrived in Germany last year - not 1.1m
Photo: DPA

Previous reports had suggested that around 1.1 million people entered Germany to seek asylum last year. But now the German government has confirmed the number was actually lower.

Racist attacks cast cloud over Dresden Unity Day planning
A police vehicle in Dresden. Photo: DPA.

As Dresden prepares to host Germany’s national Unity Day celebrations on Monday, the capital of the eastern state of Saxony is upping security after a mosque was targeted by a homemade bomb.

Sinking Deutsche Bank stock sends shock across Europe
Photo: DPA

Shares in Germany's biggest lender Deutsche Bank plummeted on the Frankfurt stock market on Friday, dragging other European banks and global markets down with it, after reports some customers were pulling money out.

The Local List
10 things you never knew about German reunification
Reunification celebrations in Hanover in 2014. Photo: DPA

With German Unity Day (October 3rd) happening on Monday, Germans are looking forward to a three-day weekend. But did you know these facts about reunification and German Unity Day?

Sponsored Article
The Inner Circle: the secret to dating in Berlin
Germany's 10 most Instagram-able places
Sponsored Article
Why Jordan is the ‘Different’ East
Lifestyle
15 pics that prove Germany is absolutely enchanting in autumn
Lifestyle
10 German films you have to watch before you die
Lifestyle
6 things about Munich that’ll stay with you forever
Sponsored Article
Retiring abroad: ensuring your health is covered
Lifestyle
10 pieces of German slang you'll never learn in class
National
Seven great reasons to stay in Germany this September
National
Ouch! Naked swimmer hospitalized after angler hooks his penis
National
Six reasons why Berlin is now known as 'the failed city'
Sponsored Article
Life in Jordan: 'Undiscovered treasure'
National
15 tell-tale signs you’ll never quite master German
Culture
7 American habits that make Germans very, very uncomfortable
Sponsored Article
The Inner Circle: the secret to dating in Berlin
Rhineland
Story of a fugitive cow who outwitted police for weeks before capture
Culture
Eleven famous Germans with surnames that'll make your sides split
Lifestyle
The best ways to get a visa as an American in Germany
Gallery
Germany's 17 Olympic gold medals in pictures
14 facts you never knew about the Brandenburg Gate
Society
Ten times Germans proved they really, really love beer
National
Six things you need to know when moving to Germany
Travel
These 10 little-known German towns are a must see
International
German scientists prove birds can sleep while flying
Technology
London v. Berlin: Which is better for startups?
Lifestyle
13 mortifying mistakes German learners always make
6,718
jobs available
Toytown Germany
Germany's English-speaking crowd