Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Dirty bottle likely source of bacteria in Mainz infant deaths

Share this article

Dirty bottle likely source of bacteria in Mainz infant deaths
Photo: DPA
15:54 CEST+02:00
The bacterial contamination suspected in the deaths of three babies in Mainz last weekend was not the result of poor hospital practices but probably caused by a single bottle dirtied during transport, officials announced Friday.

An investigation centring on suspected negligence in the Mainz University hospital and its pharmacy has cleared staff there, instead pointing to the contamination of a glass bottle well before drip-feed solution was prepared, city prosecutor Klaus-Peter Mieth said.

Staff in the pharmacy and in the children's clinic at the hospital could not be held culpable, he said.

Three babies died after they were administered with drip feeds contaminated with intestinal bacteria.

Whether the infection actually is the root cause of the children's deaths remains unclear. They were all born very prematurely and were being kept in the hospital's intensive care unit.

But it now seems certain that the contamination with the bacteria did not come about through negligence or lack of regard for standards in the Mainz Hospital.

The hospital's system was completely in order and ensured by an “excellent quality assurance system” that belonged “at the peak of even European standards,” said Martin Exner, head of the Institute for Hygiene and Health of the Bonn University Hospital and president of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene, which investigated the facility.

The investigation by Bonn University found that no bacteria was found anywhere else in the Mainz University clinic drip feed solution, and also the tubing that supplied the solution to the babies was not affected, Mieth explained.

A contamination by the manufacturer of the contents of the bottle was also considered unlikely.

Rather, the likely cause was contamination of the bottle during transport. The bacteria then got into the fluid solution, Mieth said.

The bottle was contaminated even though such products are supposed to be sterilized and sealed.

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

The Swedish university where students tackle real-world problems

Ranked among the world's best young universities in the QS Top 50 Under 50, Linköping University (LiU) uses innovative learning techniques that prepare its students to tackle the challenges of tomorrow.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular articles

Advertisement
Advertisement