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CYCLING

Cyclist Schumacher’s doping confirmed with B sample

The positive test of German cyclist Stefan Schumacher for EPO Cera during last year's Olympic Games has been confirmed by the B sample, his lawyer Michael Lehner said on Tuesday.

Cyclist Schumacher's doping confirmed with B sample
Photo: DPA

The 27-year-old rider, however, continues to protest his innocence and is determined to clear his name.

Lehner said they are contesting in particular the circumstances under which the International Olympic Committee (IOC) analysed the B sample in a laboratory of the French anti-doping agency (AFLD).

Schumacher was one of six athletes who the IOC announced had tested positive for banned-blood booster erythropoietin (EPO) CERA in Beijing after samples were re-tested.

Having already tested positive twice for EPO CERA at the 2008 Tour de France, where he won two stages, Schumacher received a two-year ban from the International Cycling Union (UCI), the sport’s governing body, in February this year.

The German denies having ever doped and on April 1 took his case to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Lausanne who will judge the case on Wednesday.

The news about Schumacher comes the same week Germany’s retired former Tour de France winner Jan Ullrich was said to be up for disciplinary procedure by the Swiss anti-doping commission.

Ullrich won the 1997 Tour de France and was a multiple runner-up behind American seven-time winner Lance Armstrong before retiring from cycling after being sacked by his T-Mobile team in 2006.

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CYCLING

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021

Demand for bicycles has soared in Europe during the coronavirus pandemic, but conversely the global supply is at record low levels, with consumers having to wait months or over a year for their bike of choice.

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021
Photo: Stocksnap/Pixabay

Bikes are projected to outsell cars in Europe by two to one by 2030.   

But 2021 will not be an easy year to buy a bike in many European countries, especially if you have a particular model in mind. 

Firstly, there's been a huge surge in demand for bikes during the pandemic, as Europeans looked for ways to stay fit and move around more freely without having to worry about being exposed to Covid-19 on public transport.

On the flip side, bike production in China, which supplies almost the entire global market, has practically ground to a halt.

The same can be said for bicycle accessories and components, which are either not being produced in Chinese factories currently or held up for months in ports in Asia due to the reduction of capacity in shipping.

 

In this short report, video producer Alex Dunham explores the issue of Europe's bike shortage in 2021.

 

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