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Teen suspect's new book claims he didn't abuse Brit

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Teen suspect's new book claims he didn't abuse Brit
Photo: DPA
12:15 CET+01:00
In a new book, the German teenager accused of sexually abusing a 13-year-old British girl during a family vacation in Turkey pleads his innocence and details his time behind bars even before a Turkish court has ruled on the case.

The German-language memoir “Marco W. – My 247 Days in a Turkish Clink” hit the shelves Friday and covers not only the fateful minutes between Marco Weiss, 18, and the alleged victim but also Weiss' thoughts and experiences as he awaited trial in a Turkish cell.

“But before it could even start it was already over for me … Maybe she was mad because she had hoped for much more. In any case, I pushed her hand away, turned over on my side and pulled up my zipper,” Weiss writes in the book, which is being excerpted by Bild.

Weiss was arrested April 12, 2007 at his hotel in Antalya, Turkey after the girl, dubbed “Caroline” in the book, and her parents went to the police. The arrest and ensuing trials sparked a media firestorm that highlighted decades-old tensions between Turkey and Germany, home to 3.5 million Turkish nationals, as well as Germany and the U.K.

The book is being released two weeks ahead of schedule by kids books specialist Hamburger Kinderbuch Verlag due to strong demand. The title is an homage to how German media referred to Weiss during the ordeal – ethical guidelines prohibit media outlets from ever publishing the last names of victims and suspects.

Weiss at the time – and in his book – said he thought the girl was 15 and maintained that any sexual contact was consensual. He also said things moved too quickly for him after meeting the girl in a disco and had plans to tell her they weren't a match.

For her part, the girl reportedly said Weiss had sexually abused her while she slept.

Weiss was eventually set free and returned to Germany in a private jet pending the outcome of the trial. If he is found guilty, he would be able to sit out the sentence in a German jail though legal experts expect the charges to be thrown out by spring.

Although the book's publication has sparked the resignation of one of Weiss' attorneys, his remaining lawyers in Germany and Turkey said they understand the teenager's literary ambitions. “Writing this book is important and useful for processing the experience psychologically,” attorney Michael Nagel told daily Die Welt.

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