• Germany's news in English
 
app_header_v3
Outrage after AfD call for armed force against refugees
Beatrix von Storch, deputy leader of the AfD. Photo: DPA

Outrage after AfD call for armed force against refugees

DPA/The Local · 1 Feb 2016, 11:44

Published: 01 Feb 2016 11:44 GMT+01:00

“Do you want women with children to be denied entry [into Germany] by armed force?” a Facebook commentator asked Beatrix von Storch, deputy leader of the AfD.

The trained lawyer, who is now an MEP, replied with a simple ‘yes’, the Süddeutsche Zeitung reports.

Von Storch later backtracked from this position that children could be shot at, while maintaining that women were fair targets.

“The use of weapons against children is rightly not permissible. Women unlike children responsible [for their actions],” she wrote on Facebook.

Shooting at women is permissible “within the narrow confines of what the law permits”, von Storch added.

With her original comment, von Storch had tried to support her party leader Frauke Petry who told a German newspaper on Saturday that “as a last resort” police should use weapons against refugees trying to cross illegally into Germany.

During an interview with the Mannheimer Morgen, Petry advocated the erection of border fences, arguing that Spain already had such measures in place.

“No policeman wants to shoot at a refugee. I don’t want it either,” said Petry. “But as a last resort weapons can be used.

“What is important is that it doesn’t come to that, and that we put a brake on the influx of refugees through an agreement with Austria and the at the EU’s outer borders.

‘Enemies of the rule of law’

The Social Democrats (SPD) and Green Party have responded to the latest outbursts from the AfD by calling for them to be put under observation by Germany’s intelligence services, Spiegel reports.

“In my opinion the AfD belongs in intelligence reports, not on the television,” SPD leader Sigmar Gabriel told tabloid Bild, referring to the ever more regular appearances of AfD leaders on political talk shows.

Volker Beck, MP for the Green party, told conservative broadsheet Die Welt that the AfD is “the enemy of the rule of law.”

However the other political parties in the Bundestag (German parliament) accused Gabriel of trying to politicize the intelligence services.

Jan Korte of Die Linke (the Left Party) described it as “typical Gabriel politicking”, while Wolfgang Bosbach of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) said that it was up to the intelligence services whom they surveilled.

Echoes of GDR?

On Twitter the word Schießbefehl (order to fire) was trending on Monday morning, as critics accused the AfD of wanting to introduce an order for police which would be similar to that carried out by the border police of East Germany (GDR), where people who attempted to escape to the west were shot.

Story continues below…

"Whoever wants to vote for the AfD is now saying they agree with an order to fire on refugees who come to Germany. Do you want that?” one commenter asked.

Another said “I believe the GDR’s Schießbefehl was legal too, at the time.”

Petry herself avoided using the word Schießbefehl in her interview, saying also that her proposal was nothing new but that the order to use a weapon “is [already] in our laws.”

For more news from Germany, join us on Facebook and Twitter.

DPA/The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Today's headlines
Munich shooting
Munich gunman inspired by rightwing Breivik: police
Photo: DPA

The lone teenager who shot dead nine people in a gun rampage in Munich was "obsessed" with mass killers such as Norwegian rightwing fanatic Anders Behring Breivik and had no links to the Islamic State group, police said Saturday.

Munich shooting
Turks, Kosovans and a Greek among shooting victims
Photo: DPA

Three Turkish citizens were among the nine people killed in Germany's Munich mall shooting. Three Kosovans were also among the nine victims.

Munich shooting
Munich gunman was likely not Isis terrorist: police
Flowers laid at the Olympia Shopping Centre underground station. Photo: DPA

According to initial investigations by Munich police, the young man who went on a shooting rampage in Munich on Friday evening was a lone gunman without motive, not a terrorist.

Munich shooting
'Lone' Munich shooter kills nine, commits suicide
Photo: DPA

A teenage German-Iranian gunman who killed nine people in a shooting spree at a busy Munich shopping centre and then committed suicide had likely acted alone, German police said Saturday.

As it happened
Nine dead in shooting rampage in Munich
File photo: DPA

Nine people are dead after "at least one person" went on a shooting spree in a Munich shopping centre on Friday evening. An attacker is believed to be among the dead.

German Turkish community split by unrest after coup plot
Pro-Erdogan protesters in Berlin. Photo: DPA

Hatred between supporters of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and those opposed to him has exploded on social media in Germany in the wake of a failed coup attempt last Friday.

Germany stresses defence of Baltics after Trump comments
Photo: DPA

Germany on Friday stressed its promise to protect its NATO allies after White House hopeful Donald Trump called the commitment into question.

Three quarters of Germans fear terror attack 'soon'
Police guard a football stadium. Photo: DPA

The figure has shot up from 69 percent just two weeks ago.

Starving stork is unexpected customer at pharmacy
Photo: DPA

Was it on a mission to deliver the morning-after pill instead of babies?

Anti-drugs campaign is Scientology in disguise: spies
The Church of Scientology's German headquarters in Berlin. Photo: DPA

The controversial church is considered an "anti-constitutional sect" in Germany.

Sponsored Article
Why you should attend an international job fair
Analysis & Opinion
Nice was an attack on France, not on Germany
Sponsored Article
Avoid hidden fees when sending money overseas
National
Bavaria train attack: Were police right to shoot to kill?
National
How to get German citizenship (or just stay forever)
Sponsored Article
Why Swiss hospitality graduates are in demand
Technology
Brexit will turn Berlin into 'Europe’s startup capital'
Sponsored Article
Five things Americans should know about voting abroad
Travel
Six soothing day trips to escape the bustle of Berlin
International
'Germany needs to make UK come to its senses'
Features
Six odd things Germans do in the summer
Travel
These 10 little-known German towns are a must see
Sponsored Article
Why expats choose international health insurance
Features
How two gay dads cut through German red tape to start a family
National
Five things to know about guns in Germany
Sponsored Article
Health insurance for expats in Germany: a quick guide
Culture
10 things you need to know before attending a German wedding
Sponsored Article
Avoid hidden fees when sending money overseas
National
Eight weird habits you'll pick up living in Germany
Lifestyle
Six reasons 'super-cool' Berlin isn't all it's cracked up to be
Society
Only one country likes getting naked on the beach more than Germany
Sponsored Article
Why Swiss hospitality graduates are in demand
Lifestyle
23 ridiculously fascinating things you never knew about Berlin
Culture
8 German words that perfectly sum up your 20s
Sponsored Article
Why you should attend an international job fair
Lifestyle
Can't make it past the door at Berlin's most famous club? Help is at hand
Business & Money
Why Frankfurt could steal London's crown as Europe's finance capital
Features
6 surprising things I learned about Germany while editing The Local
Culture
Five sure-fire ways to impress Germans with your manners
10,799
jobs available
Toytown Germany
Germany's English-speaking crowd