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Germany's safest and most dangerous cities

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Photo: DPA
11:39 CEST+02:00
Crime statistics published on Wednesday revealed Germany's most dangerous and safest cities. They also showed a sharp rise in child pornography and burglary offences.

The 2013 national crime figures, which were leaked to Welt newspaper earlier this week, show just under six million crimes were recorded in Germany last year.

When broken down to the number of crimes per 100,000 inhabitants, Frankfurt am Main rates as the most dangerous city in Germany with 16,292 crimes per 100,000 people. Its high ranking was put down to its red light district and the large airport.

Cologne was second in the list followed by Berlin and Düsseldorf.

In Bavaria there were just 5,073 crimes per 10,000 inhabitants, almost 40 percent less than in North Rhine-Westphalia. Baden-Württemberg was the second safest state with 5,450 crimes.

And Munich ranked as the safest large city in Germany. It had half the crime rate of other German cities with 7,400 offences per 100,000 inhabitants.

The crime figures, presented by interior minister Thomas de Mazière on Wednesday, also revealed burglaries had reached their highest level for 15 years with 150,000 domestic break-ins recorded, a rise of 3.7 percent on 2012.

Oliver Malchow, head of police union the GdP, called for more officers to be recruited to tackle the increase. “We have too few people, with too little time to work intensively on burglaries,” he said.

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The figures also showed a 28 percent rise in child pornography offences with 4,144 recorded incidents.

Crime fell overall by 0.6 percent, while the number of non-German suspects rose by seven percent.

SEE ALSO: Officer puts neo-Nazi stickers in police van

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