• Germany's news in English

Germany says Italy must reform despite deadlock

The Local · 26 Feb 2013, 10:22

Published: 26 Feb 2013 10:22 GMT+01:00

"The politicians in Rome know that Italy still needs a policy of reform, a policy of (budgetary) consolidation," said Guido Westerwelle, calling for a new government to be formed "as quickly as possible."

"This is not only in the interests of Italy, but the interests of Europe as a whole ... When it comes to beating the debt crisis, we are all in the same boat, whether we live in Germany, France, Italy or Spain," added the minister.

He stressed it was therefore important for politicians in Italy to take responsibility for the bloc as a whole, he added.

Italian elections ended in a stalemate in parliament between right and left after a crunch vote in which the real winner appeared to be a new protest party calling for a referendum on Italy's membership of the euro.

The campaign in Italy was marked by a reaction against the austerity measures pushed by German Chancellor Angela Merkel in a bid to beat the eurozone debt crisis that has propelled the 17-nation bloc into recession.

Story continues below…

"Italy plays a central role for a successful overcoming of the European debt crisis and therefore we count on the new government to continue the policy of consolidation and reforms in a consistent matter," concluded Westerwelle.


The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

11:32 February 26, 2013 by melbournite
"The politicians in Rome know that Italy still needs a policy of reform"

Err no, the unelected technocrat most associated with your "reform", Monti, got less than 10%. The biggest single party - the 5 star movement - explicity says "up yours" to your "reform"
12:01 February 26, 2013 by smart2012
And to all of this we need to say also thanks to the silly policy of Frau Verkel..
17:08 February 26, 2013 by sonriete
so much for no Diktat.
18:19 February 26, 2013 by schneebeck
That photo alongside that title is just hilarious.
18:26 February 26, 2013 by sonriete
this was my favorite quote in the press this morning;

"European Commission spokesman Olivier Bailly said that, while the Europe's executive body took note of the concerns of the Italian people, it also expected Rome to adhere to promises of reforms."

So to put that in plain english they"take note" of democracy before utterly disregarding the results of democratic elections" HA HA HA
18:45 February 26, 2013 by Englishted
Got to love him coming from a party in steep decline and still trying to bully any country that has the nerve to believe these austerity measures are killing Europe and driving it's electorate to protest parties or extreme parties .

Democracy crying out in it death throngs is totally ignored by those in power a very dangerous game to play.
19:25 February 26, 2013 by IchBinKönig
Isnt the Euro wonderful? When I was a child, before the Euro existed, I visited a gas station in a neighboring European country, and the gas station attendant gave me a dirty look because of my German plates. Now that we have the Euro, when I visit ANY other European country as a German, I get nothing but loving looks and the occasional handy in the bathroom. Isn't the Euro wunderbar? Cant believe people used to have to show a passport at the border and elect their OWN officials. Can you imagine? Oh the humanity!
00:44 February 27, 2013 by skippy01
I don't understand? Italy will not "reform". Its like no one is explaining the reality of economics to Germans. Germany entered the Euro to stop it becoming a zombie economy like Japan. The low valued euro let germany export more than it would with the Dmark. The germans lent money to southern europeans to keep the euro low, knowing they were bad debtors. Then they are surprised that the southern europeans have spent the money and want more.

Germany's choices are simple:

a) Print money like the US (they have increased the money base x4 since 2008), so they can give money to the southern europeans, keep the euro low, but as a result have high inflation in 5-10 years putting everyone on a fixed income in the poor house (pensioners, unemployed etc)


b) Leave the euro and go back to the Dmark. Exports will crash with a high Dmark, compnanies will stop hiring, the young will become unemployed and will stop paying taxes. Then in 10 years companies will go broke be unable to pay people pensions, etc etc etc.

Japan followed option b) they have now started to print money like nobodies business to get out of their "frugal, saving" mess.

Unfortunately at the start of a financial crisis the lender has the whip hand. At the end the borrower does, the borrowers in southern europe no have the whip hand, Germany has to keep giving them money otherwise Germany's future will be eaten by older generations pensions. It's sad but I don't see any other way out for the Euro zone.
Today's headlines
Bavarian conservatives want national burqa ban
A woman in a burqa in Munich's Odeonplatz. Photo: DPA

Bavarian conservatives want national burqa ban

45 minutes ago

The conservative Christian Social Union (CSU), ruling party in Bavaria, want to pass a new law making it illegal for anyone to wear a burqa in Germany.

COP 21 climate conference
We owe our children a climate deal: Merkel
Environmental activists demonstrate in Frankfurt on Sunday. Photo: DPA

We owe our children a climate deal: Merkel

46 minutes ago

World leaders gathered in Paris for the COP 21 climate conference must find an "ambitious, comprehensive, fair and binding" way to stop global warming, Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Monday.

Supermarket Christmas ad is surprise downer
Screenshot of Edeka commercial.

Supermarket Christmas ad is surprise downer

4 hours ago

An ad by German supermarket chain Edeka makes an emotional plea to viewers to remember what's most important during the holidays: family. But did it make the message just a touch too dark?

Hamburg voters throw out Olympic bid plan
Anti-Olympics graffiti on the ground outside a Hamburg U-Bahn station. Photo: DPA

Hamburg voters throw out Olympic bid plan

4 hours ago

Hamburg's bid to host the 2024 Olympics fell at the first hurdle on Sunday when residents voted 'No' in a crunch referendum as the German public again torpedoed plans to host a Games.

Snow and storms usher in first day of winter
Photo: DPA

Snow and storms usher in first day of winter

5 hours ago

A cold front has reached the centre of Germany, casting a spell of cold over the north of the country, while the south remains warm.

Merkel pins refugee crisis hopes on Turkey
Chancellor Angela Merkel (l) speaks with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (m) and French President Francois Hollande (r). Photo: DPA

Merkel pins refugee crisis hopes on Turkey

6 hours ago

Chancellor Angela Merkel and other EU leaders agreed a joint action plan to limit the number of refugees arriving in Europe via Turkey at a Brussels summit on Sunday.

Police intervene in Berlin refugee home brawls
Soldiers setting up beds in the hangars at the former Tempelhof airport in October. Photo: DPA

Police intervene in Berlin refugee home brawls

7 hours ago

Clashes broke out Sunday between hundreds of asylum seekers at a shelter in Berlin, in the second mass brawl to erupt over the weekend in Germany's crowded migrant accommodations.

Germany to send 1,200 troops to aid ISIS fight
Berlin has offered France Tornado reconnaissance jets. Photo: Luftwaffe

Germany to send 1,200 troops to aid ISIS fight

1 day ago

Germany is planning to deploy 1,200 troops to help France in the fight against Islamic State jihadists in Syria, its army chief said Sunday, in what would be the military's biggest deployment abroad.

Refugee spending revs up German growth
Germany will spend €10bn on housing, feeding and processing the more than 800,000 people coming to the country this year. Photo: Patrick Pleul/dpa

Refugee spending revs up German growth

1 day ago

A massive influx of refugees, and accompanying billions in public spending, have provided Germany with a long-awaited answer to partners' calls for it to do more to jumpstart the eurozone economy.

Lufthansa inks pay deal with 30,000 ground staff
Lufthansa has yet to strike a deal with the UFO flight attendant's union. Photo: Boris Roessler/dpa

Lufthansa inks pay deal with 30,000 ground staff

1 day ago

German carrier Lufthansa, reeling under a series of recent strikes, said on Saturday that it had reached a wage rise accord with services sector union Verdi covering 30,000 ground staff.

Germany's 10 most-expensive cities
Sponsored Article
How to figure out healthcare abroad
German ISS astronaut tells kids to follow their dreams
Sponsored Article
Why family companies need free trade and TTIP
90 percent of Germans want tougher security
Sponsored Article
'Innovative companies like Hövding benefit most from TTIP'
Are you living in Germany's most expensive city?
Sponsored Article
The cheapest and fastest way to transfer money
Should singer accused of homophobia represent Germany at Eurovision?
70 years since the Nuremberg Trials
The German connection in the Paris attacks
Snow expected on 'first weekend of winter'
10 years of Angela Merkel in Berlin
Could soldiers soon be patrolling German streets?
Second German Paris victim was teacher and journalist
'We can't beat Isis with military means'
How will Germany help France fight Isis?
One German confirmed dead in Paris attacks
'Don't take Paris out on refugees': German defence minister
Germany's minute of silence for Paris victims
Nightclub bans refugees for harassing women
OPINION: Refugees must learn to respect German values
The ancient German community at the heart of Texas
jobs available
Toytown Germany
Germany's English-speaking crowd