• Germany edition
 
Germany says Italy must reform despite deadlock
Photo: DPA

Germany says Italy must reform despite deadlock

Published: 26 Feb 2013 10:22 GMT+01:00
Updated: 26 Feb 2013 10:22 GMT+01:00

"The politicians in Rome know that Italy still needs a policy of reform, a policy of (budgetary) consolidation," said Guido Westerwelle, calling for a new government to be formed "as quickly as possible."

"This is not only in the interests of Italy, but the interests of Europe as a whole ... When it comes to beating the debt crisis, we are all in the same boat, whether we live in Germany, France, Italy or Spain," added the minister.

He stressed it was therefore important for politicians in Italy to take responsibility for the bloc as a whole, he added.

Italian elections ended in a stalemate in parliament between right and left after a crunch vote in which the real winner appeared to be a new protest party calling for a referendum on Italy's membership of the euro.

The campaign in Italy was marked by a reaction against the austerity measures pushed by German Chancellor Angela Merkel in a bid to beat the eurozone debt crisis that has propelled the 17-nation bloc into recession.

"Italy plays a central role for a successful overcoming of the European debt crisis and therefore we count on the new government to continue the policy of consolidation and reforms in a consistent matter," concluded Westerwelle.

AFP/mry

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

11:32 February 26, 2013 by melbournite
"The politicians in Rome know that Italy still needs a policy of reform"

Err no, the unelected technocrat most associated with your "reform", Monti, got less than 10%. The biggest single party - the 5 star movement - explicity says "up yours" to your "reform"
12:01 February 26, 2013 by smart2012
And to all of this we need to say also thanks to the silly policy of Frau Verkel..
17:08 February 26, 2013 by sonriete
so much for no Diktat.
18:19 February 26, 2013 by schneebeck
That photo alongside that title is just hilarious.
18:26 February 26, 2013 by sonriete
this was my favorite quote in the press this morning;

"European Commission spokesman Olivier Bailly said that, while the Europe's executive body took note of the concerns of the Italian people, it also expected Rome to adhere to promises of reforms."

So to put that in plain english they"take note" of democracy before utterly disregarding the results of democratic elections" HA HA HA
18:45 February 26, 2013 by Englishted
Got to love him coming from a party in steep decline and still trying to bully any country that has the nerve to believe these austerity measures are killing Europe and driving it's electorate to protest parties or extreme parties .

Democracy crying out in it death throngs is totally ignored by those in power a very dangerous game to play.
19:25 February 26, 2013 by IchBinKönig
Isnt the Euro wonderful? When I was a child, before the Euro existed, I visited a gas station in a neighboring European country, and the gas station attendant gave me a dirty look because of my German plates. Now that we have the Euro, when I visit ANY other European country as a German, I get nothing but loving looks and the occasional handy in the bathroom. Isn't the Euro wunderbar? Cant believe people used to have to show a passport at the border and elect their OWN officials. Can you imagine? Oh the humanity!
00:44 February 27, 2013 by skippy01
I don't understand? Italy will not "reform". Its like no one is explaining the reality of economics to Germans. Germany entered the Euro to stop it becoming a zombie economy like Japan. The low valued euro let germany export more than it would with the Dmark. The germans lent money to southern europeans to keep the euro low, knowing they were bad debtors. Then they are surprised that the southern europeans have spent the money and want more.

Germany's choices are simple:

a) Print money like the US (they have increased the money base x4 since 2008), so they can give money to the southern europeans, keep the euro low, but as a result have high inflation in 5-10 years putting everyone on a fixed income in the poor house (pensioners, unemployed etc)

or

b) Leave the euro and go back to the Dmark. Exports will crash with a high Dmark, compnanies will stop hiring, the young will become unemployed and will stop paying taxes. Then in 10 years companies will go broke be unable to pay people pensions, etc etc etc.

Japan followed option b) they have now started to print money like nobodies business to get out of their "frugal, saving" mess.

Unfortunately at the start of a financial crisis the lender has the whip hand. At the end the borrower does, the borrowers in southern europe no have the whip hand, Germany has to keep giving them money otherwise Germany's future will be eaten by older generations pensions. It's sad but I don't see any other way out for the Euro zone.
Today's headlines
UN climate talks shuffle to a close in Bonn
Photo: DPA

UN climate talks shuffle to a close in Bonn

Concern was high at a perceived lack of urgency as UN climate negotiations shuffled towards a close in Bonn on Saturday with just 14 months left to finalise a new, global pact. READ  

Berlin slams Italy Nazi claims court ruling
Italy's National Partisans' Association welcomed the court decision. Photo: DPA

Berlin slams Italy Nazi claims court ruling

Italy's constitutional court has ruled that victims of Nazi-era war crimes can sue Germany in Italian courts, rejecting a UN ruling and provoking a strong reaction from Berlin on Friday. READ  

Expats reveal another side of Berlin Wall
Photo: Paul Sullivan

Expats reveal another side of Berlin Wall

Two expats who walked the Mauerweg - the 160-kilometre trail that runs the length of the former Berlin Wall - have written a book about forgotten aspects of its past and present. READ  

Karstadt closes six stores to stay afloat
Photo: DPA

Karstadt closes six stores to stay afloat

Germany's biggest department store chain Karstadt will close at least six stores, putting around 2,000 jobs at risk, in a drastic bid by its new boss to return it to profit. READ  

Quiz
How well do you know Germany?
Photos: DPA/Shutterstock

How well do you know Germany?

Do you know your Saxony facts from your Saxony-Anhalt ones? Test your knowledge of Germany's federal states in The Local's quiz. READ  

Climate chief hails Bonn greenhouse gas deal
Pollution from a coal-fired power station in Frimmersdorf, North Rhine-Westphalia. Photo: DPA

Climate chief hails Bonn greenhouse gas deal

The UN's climate chief hailed a European agreement in Bonn on greenhouse gases on Friday as providing "valuable momentum" for a world pact to be inked in Paris next year. READ  

Germany gets €780m EU rebate for poor growth
Photo: DPA

Germany gets €780m EU rebate for poor growth

Germany will get an early Christmas present of around €779 million from the EU, thanks to weaker than expected GDP growth. READ  

Stay inside after blast, Ludwigshafen told
Photo: DPA

Stay inside after blast, Ludwigshafen told

It will take several days to find out what caused a massive explosion on Thursday which rocked a town on the Rhine, killing a builder and injuring 26 others. READ  

German helicopter fleet 'not fit for Nato'
An NH90 helicopter. Photo: DPA

German helicopter fleet 'not fit for Nato'

Germany's fleet of NH90 helicopters is undergoing engineering checks after one of them suffered a serious engine failure, in the latest blow to the country's military capabilities. READ  

Ex-boss of Berlin Airport farce gets €1.2m
Rainer Schwarz at a court hearing in September into the case. Photo: DPA

Ex-boss of Berlin Airport farce gets €1.2m

The man who was blamed for Berlin's miserable attempt to build a new airport must be paid more than €1 million - after being fired. READ  

RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER AND ALERTS
Photo: DPA
Politics
Satirist lives the dream on EU gravy train
Photo: DPA
Gallery
PHOTOS: Huge explosion rocks Ludwigshafen
Photo: DPA/Shutterstock
Gallery
Which high school cliche is your German city?
Photo: DPA
Gallery
Storm hits southern Germany
Sponsored Article
An international school unlike any other : School on the Rhine
Photo: Fitzpatrick family
Society
'We still don't know what happened to Matthew'
Photo: Mariana Schroeder
Munich
Special Report: Hope and chaos at Munich's refugee shelters
Photo: DPA
Culture
Can you top our history quiz leaderboard?
Photo: DPA/Shutterstock
Gallery
11 things Germans are afraid of...
Photo: DPA
Business & Money
JobTalk: All you need to know about working in Germany
National
Share news tips with The Local Germany
Sponsored Article
Bilingual education from nursery to graduation at Phorms
Latest news from The Local in Austria

More news from Austria at thelocal.at

Latest news from The Local in Switzerland

More news from Switzerland at thelocal.ch

Latest news from The Local in Denmark

More news from Denmark at thelocal.dk

Latest news from The Local in Spain

More news from Spain at thelocal.es

Latest news from The Local in France

More news from France at thelocal.fr

Latest news from The Local in Italy

More news from Italy at thelocal.it

Latest news from The Local in Norway

More news from Norway at thelocal.no

Latest news from The Local in Sweden

More news from Sweden at thelocal.se

3,524
jobs available
Toytown Germany
Germany's English-speaking crowd