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Row holds up child abuse compensation

Published: 20 Feb 2013 12:44 GMT+01:00

Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Scharrenberger called for the states to put in their share of the money, while victims' groups said they were bitterly disappointed at the results so far.

The government set up a "round table" group of representatives from the federal and state governments as well as victims groups to come up with recommendations of what to do after numerous cases of abuse were revealed from around the country.

A major recommendation was to set up a €100 million compensation fund - the cost of which would be shared between state and federal governments. But all the state governments apart from Bavaria have said they could not make their contributions, saying there was no overarching concept for how the money would be distributed.

Leutheusser-Scharrenberger rejected the claims, and said the federal government would pay its share and start operating the fund.

She also on Wednesday presented a new draft law designed to improve victim protection - a draft that has been hanging in limbo for the past 20 months as state and central governments scrapped over who should pay for what.

“We have to do everything we can to make sure that the urgently needed help for child sex abuse victims can be freed up,” she told the Wiesbadener Kurier regional newspaper on Wednesday.

Matthias Katsch, speaking for the victims said that the government should first begin paying out compensation from the €50 million in the fund.

Katsch added that the fact victims have had to wait nearly three years since the round table was set up for compensation was a source of “great anger.”

DPA/DAPD/The Local/jcw

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

19:32 February 20, 2013 by rosenthalenglish
Now if this article was about the church refusing to pay we would have loads of derogatory comments,but when governments and states don't pay up,utter silence from our Catholic Bashing commentators on this site.
04:07 February 21, 2013 by parografik
You're kidding, right? Ok, the governments should pay up. Get on that, government, you corrupt SOBs!

And the Catholic church should open their books as well, and quit the moralizing. The pope wants to retire, so he finds some quasi legal reason to justify his actions, while in reality it is tradition that empowers the church to maintain it's myth of consistency. Let's not forget that these abuses happened within Church structures and institutions, and the cover up begins within their walls. There is no condoning the lapses on the civil authorities, but the perpetrators were first and foremost agents of the poor church.
05:30 February 21, 2013 by owlguard
Everybodiy is a victim. Everybody has their hand out. Since when did victims of criminals get compensated? Some crook steals my tv and pawns it. If they get caught they go to jail but I don't get compensation. When some drunk wrecks my car and the drunk has no insurance, the only compensation I am going to get comes from my own insurance company. Some robber kills my son, who is working at the store, the robber goes to jail but what do I get? Nothing. The State has no money except the money it takes from me in taxes. So why am I paying for the sexual abuse of some administrator who should be put in jail? And before you jump on me, I agree, sexual abuse of children is horrible but so is armed robber, murder committed by drunk drivers, and a host of other criminal activities.
09:07 February 21, 2013 by Firmino
Well I'm guessing had you been raped as child you'd be thinking differently..... The very least the church can do is pay for its crimes.
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