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Fracking Matt Damon movie joins Berlinale

The Local · 13 Dec 2012, 14:39

Published: 13 Dec 2012 14:39 GMT+01:00

Van Sant will present Promised Land, an ecological drama about fracking starring Matt Damon, Frances McDormand and John Krasinski at the 63rd Berlinale, taking place February 7 to 17.

In the film Damon plays a corporate salesman sent to an economically depressed rural town with the task of buying up drilling rights to the local citizens' properties, but comes up against a grassroots anti-fracking campaign.

The festival will also showcase new releases from South Korea's Hong Sang-soo and Ulrich Seidl of Austria.

Organisers of the first major European film festival of the year said Hong Sang-soo, a critics' favourite, would premiere Nobody's Daughter Haewon, the follow-up to his Cannes entry In Another Country starring French actress Isabelle Huppert.

Seidl, one of Europe's most controversial film-makers known for his frank takes on sex and exploitation, will enter the running with Paradise: Hope, the final picture in a trilogy, about a girl who falls in love with a man four decades her senior.

US animators Kirk De Micco and Chris Sanders will premiere the 3-D movie The Croods featuring the voices of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone and Ryan Reynolds. It will appear in the main showcase but out of competition.

Also slated to screen are Romanian director Calin Peter Netzer's drama Child's Pose and Chilean-Spanish production Gloria by Sebastian Lelio.

The Berlinale Special section will present the documentary Redemption Impossible by Christian Rost and Claus Strigel, about a rehabilitation project in Austria for chimps used in pharmaceutical testing.

Award-winning Chinese director Wong Kar Wai will lead the jury handing out the Golden and Silver Bear prizes on February 16.

Story continues below…

And French film-maker and producer Claude Lanzmann, famous for his 1985 documentary Shoah, will be honoured with a lifetime achievement award at the event.

Italy's veteran film-makers Paolo and Vittorio Taviani won the Golden Bear this year for Caesar Must Die, a docu-drama about inmates staging Shakespeare at a high-security prison.

AFP/The Local/jlb

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

19:03 December 13, 2012 by IchBinKönig
Nice to see that Propaganda films paid for by the Royal Family of the United Arab Emirates making the Berlinale! Oil Barons making anti-natural gas movies are awesome. Congratulations!

Only a small issue, is the fracking claims were debunked as both the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and the Environmental Protection Agency, both of which found no evidence of contamination.

But that doesn't matter to you. Go UAE!!
19:30 December 13, 2012 by ProgandaLady
Hmm. I don't know what to believe... Does theLocal.de know how Kim Kardashian feels about the issue?
21:31 December 13, 2012 by Staticjumper
@IchBinKonig, this is no different than the "Erin Brokovich" movie. Why should Hollywood let science get in the way of a good activist film?
02:29 December 14, 2012 by Eric1
Just another propaganda film promoting poverty and misery in the western world. Forward Comrades!
17:03 December 14, 2012 by Timec
Ahh, it's always so fun watching people like Eric1 freak out over things they're clueless about.

Mind you, the film probably won't be very good - Gus van Sant can be a good director and one with a strong sense of empathy and compassion, but too often he falls into the same narrative traps - but those who see it as some sort of communist propaganda are only parading their own ignorance.
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