• Germany edition
 
Man 'held for years over paranoia that was right'
Bavarian justice minister, Beate Merk. Photo: DPA

Man 'held for years over paranoia that was right'

Published: 19 Nov 2012 14:10 GMT+01:00
Updated: 19 Nov 2012 14:10 GMT+01:00

State Justice Minister Beate Merk says Gustl Mollath was and still is dangerous. He was acquitted of attacking his wife, but sentenced to compulsory psychiatric care, after an evaluation found that he had developed a "paranoid system of thought."

In an interview with Sunday's Süddeutsche Zeitung, law professor Henning Ernst Müller said major mistakes were made during Mollath's trial in 2006.

Three years earlier, in 2003, Mollath accused his wife and other employees at the HypoVereinsbank (HVB) of illegally funnelling clients' money into bank accounts in Switzerland. To bolster his claims, he offered up a folder full of documents.

But prosecutors did not investigate - and later, Mollath's wife filed suit against her husband for physically attacking her.

According to Müller, a professor of criminal law at the University of Regensburg, she had strong motivation to make false allegations against him.

Last week Merk defended prosecutors' decision not to probe the corruption claims against Mollath's wife, saying they did not have reasonable suspicion to believe the allegations based on the material provided.

Yet an audit conducted by HypoVereinsbank in 2003, which was only recently made public, suggests prosecutors had good cause to doubt the credibility of Mollath's wife.

"All verifiable claims were found to be accurate," the Süddeutsche Zeitung cited the HVB report as saying.

Müller told the paper that the justice minister had a responsibility to instigate an independent review of the case.

The bank's report means that Gustl Mollath's supposed crimes must be seen "in a completely different light," Müller argued. He also criticised the court for disregarding the allegations against Mollath's wife in evaluating her testimony.

On Wednesday, the Social Democrats in Bavaria's state parliament threatened to open an inquiry into the matter - but Merk has hit back, accusing the opposition of using the case for political gain.

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Don't miss...X
Left Right

Your comments about this article

18:55 November 19, 2012 by raandy
"an evaluation found that he had developed a "paranoid system of thought."

has it ever occurred to these people that it might not be him it could be that he was surrounded by malcontents.
19:02 November 19, 2012 by Landmine
"sentenced to compulsory psychiatric care, after an evaluation found that he had developed a "paranoid system of thought."

There you go, shrinks will see faults in everyday normal people.... Ev er hear one say "no that person is perfectly normal"?
21:43 November 19, 2012 by wxman
This reminds me of the epitaph on a hypochondriac's headstone, "I Told You I Was Sick!".
00:58 November 20, 2012 by bobmarchiano
I wish him all the best from the millions he should be getting from the ......

Oh I forgot this is Germany
03:03 November 20, 2012 by wood artist
Seems like there might be some truth in that old saying: Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're NOT out to get you.

Just sayin'

wa
15:50 November 21, 2012 by Bernhard Pallmann
Many Thanks for all comments supporting the liberation of Gustl Mollath from the Horror-bavarian state-Fornesic Psychiatry of Bayreuth, from "the Modern Dr. Mengeles from Haar to Straubing"!

"Beate Dr. jur." Merk, CSU, is one of the "Kriminelle Faktenmacher in der CSU Bayern, der Muenchner Mordkommission", the Munich Murder-Commission of the local Bavarian Police). With Gust Mollath and his group of finest german and worldwide people we are staying in contact since end 2011. Mr. Mollath is a) a pur democrat b) innocent and never ever knocked his former wife, a black-money-cleaner-bandit of the HypoVereinsbank, Bavaria.

He is c) a victim of the CSU-death angels ("CSU Todsesengel Bayern"). We help him - and put him long time ago on the Top-Position to win the "Alexander Zouras Medienpreis 2012" (see media & Internet). Speaker Dr. Bernhard Pallmann email: civilcourage@hotmail.es
16:03 December 14, 2012 by aslanleon
Some decades back in the USA, a psychology student who was evaluated as perfectly normal arranged to be committed to a mental hospital. After a few days therapy, he began asking to be released but without telling the doctors that he was a plant. He couldn't get out. They had already prepared a hundred page file about all his mental 'illnesses'. In the end, his university had to use political muscle and his research plan to get him out, and the hospital fought this as well.

There are a number of people who really need to be in mental hospitals, mostly because they are dangerous to themselves and others, but I fear that too many are merely eccentric nuisances who annoy people, and I take that very personally as a threat-- so am I paranoid or merely eccentric and annoying?
Today's headlines
Expat Dispatches
'Look at those German shanty towns!'
Kleingärten in Leipzig. Photo: DPA

'Look at those German shanty towns!'

Visitors to Germany can sometimes be confused by the country's love of allotments in cities, known as a Kleingarten. Teacher and blogger Kathleen Ralf tells us what it's all about. READ  

Lightning rods further delay Berlin Airport
Closed until further notice: Berlin's troubled new airport. Photo: DPA

Lightning rods further delay Berlin Airport

Too few lightning rods and an undersized emergency generator have prevented part of Berlin's new airport from opening. Safety inspectors refused to sign off on the airport's north pier, thwarting progress on the massively delayed construction project. READ  

Two thirds of Berlin's tourist flats now illegal
Photo: DPA

Two thirds of Berlin's tourist flats now illegal

Two thirds of Berlin's 12,000 tourist apartments advertised on sites such as Airbnb were being run illegally from Friday following a law change, leaving hosts open to potential punishment. READ  

Lost goat halts Munich Airport trains
Fritzi underneath the train. Photo: Freiwillige Feuerwehr Unterschließheim/DPA

Lost goat halts Munich Airport trains

A lost pet goat called Fritzi halted trains to Munich Airport and had to be rescued from the tracks after suffering a concussion. READ  

Germany crowned U19 European Champions
Photo: EPA/Tibor Illyes HUNGARY OUT

Germany crowned U19 European Champions

Germany’s U19 football team added to a glorious summer of sport for the country by winning the European Championships in Budapest on Thursday night. READ  

World War I anniversary
100 years ago, Germans celebrated war's outbreak
August 1914. German soldiers march off to war in France. Photo: DPA

100 years ago, Germans celebrated war's outbreak

A hundred years ago on Friday Germany declared war on Russia and was preparing for an attack on France in the hope that Britain would stay neutral. Four years on, famine was ravaging the country and two million soldiers had been killed on the battlefield. READ  

Environment Agency urges fast fracking ban
Photo: DPA

Environment Agency urges fast fracking ban

Germany's Federal Environment Agency (UBA) is encouraging lawmakers to hurry up and ban fracking in all but name, saying the process is too dangerous to even consider allowing. READ  

German of the Week
'Now I can grow cannabis at home'
Günter Weiglein. Photo: DPA

'Now I can grow cannabis at home'

Günter Weiglein is one of three men in Germany who is allowed to grow his own cannabis thanks to a court ruling last week. But he tells The Local he’s not celebrating just yet. READ  

Germany tops penis enlargement table
Do your wurst, doc. Photo: DPA

Germany tops penis enlargement table

Germany is the world’s leader in penis enlargements, with five times as many people in the country undergoing the procedure than anywhere else in the world. Globally, Germany carries out the fourth highest amount of cosmetic surgery operations. READ  

The Local List
The best words in Austrian German
Which one is the Austrian word for tomato? Photo: APA/dpa

The best words in Austrian German

If you’ve lived in Germany, or you learnt Hochdeutsch at school, you may be surprised by some of the language differences between Austria and parts of Germany. READ  

RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER AND ALERTS
Photo: DPA
Society
Your lottery numbers are 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13...
Photo: DPA
Gallery
Five reasons to visit Oktoberfest (and five not to)
Photo: DPA
Society
Huge Bavarian crop circle puzzles crowds
Photo: DPA
Analysis & Opinion
Have Your Say: Should Germany legalize cannabis?
Photo: DPA
Education
Germany's students fail to graduate in time
Photo: DPA
Gallery
Hamburg harbour lit up in blue
Business & Money
JobTalk: 'Application process is failing'
Photo: Bundesarchiv/Bild 183-S45825
Culture
Germany puts 700,000 WWI docs online
Photo: DPA
Society
This man wants to give all of us €12,000 a year
Photo: DPA
Education
Top university switches master's courses to English
Travel
Plans unveiled for bike trail along former Iron Curtain
Photo: DPA
Gallery
The Local List: 12 best words in German
Photo: Europeana.de 1914 - 1918
Gallery
A German soldier's life behind WWI lines
Education
Raising the bar for law & business in Germany
Photo: DPA
Business & Money
JobTalk: All you need to know about working in Germany
Photo: DPA
Features
The Local List Archive - Your guide to all things German
National
Share news tips with The Local Germany
Sponsored Article
Bilingual school turning education on its head
Sponsored Article
CurrencyFair: Why it pays when making overseas transfers
Latest news from The Local in Austria

More news from Austria at thelocal.at

Latest news from The Local in Switzerland

More news from Switzerland at thelocal.ch

Latest news from The Local in Denmark

More news from Denmark at thelocal.dk

Latest news from The Local in Spain

More news from Spain at thelocal.es

Latest news from The Local in France

More news from France at thelocal.fr

Latest news from The Local in Italy

More news from Italy at thelocal.it

Latest news from The Local in Norway

More news from Norway at thelocal.no

Latest news from The Local in Sweden

More news from Sweden at thelocal.se

3,290
jobs available
Toytown Germany
Germany's English-speaking crowd