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UN: immigrant women need better protection

Published: 02 Nov 2012 08:55 GMT+01:00

The "high level of violence" suffered by immigrant women particularly from Turkey and Russia is of particular concern, the UN report said on Thursday.

Overall, the country got good marks for human rights conditions, but was found lacking in its deportation of asylum seekers and in the poor integration of the Sinti and Roma populations.

The report said that although the German government and agencies haddone considerable work to combat violence against women, more needed to be done, and it called for closer collaboration on the state and federal levels.

Germany is also still failing to promote enough women to leadership positions in business, the UN said. The continuing pay gap between men and women was also of concern. The government should “considerably strengthen” its efforts to promote the hiring of women for leadership positions in the private sector, according to the report.

The report also addresses several issues related to asylum seekers in Germany, and calls on the federal government to ensure that asylum seekers, even those suspected of terrorism, not be deported to countries that torture people.

The UN human rights experts also say Germany should decide whether it will extend the freeze it has on sending asylum seekers who entered the EU through Greece back to the troubled country.

The Roma and Sinti populations in Germany should also have better access to education, housing, work, and healthcare, the report finds. The federal government should also do more to prevent the spread of racist propaganda on the internet, the experts say.

DPA/The Local/mbw

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

11:12 November 2, 2012 by raandy
One would expect this kind of report from the UN.

The high level of violence towards females is the vast cultural difference between countries such as Turkey and Russia. These problems resulted long ago, tolerance of this behavior is common in these nation, unlike here in Germany. We know what the problems are,the solutions are not that easy to discover,law enforcement, responds when called, Germany denounces these acts and provides security(safe houses) for women when asked for.

The Sinti and Roma populations do not want to integrate ,mainly they just want to live here, hard enough to get or keep their children in school, let alone integrate them with the main stream population.These folks do not want their children educated on the whole.

I suppose the Government could police the racist remarks on the internet, but who knows how that would be abused.

The Government should not return citizens to countries that use any form of torture, unfortunate that their respective countries all use torture, so where do you send them? I think any reasonable assessment would show that immigrating into Germany is easy, staying not so easy, doing nothing to stop the flow would soon overburden the host countries recourses.

As far as women leadership in business.qualifications should rule not gender.

The UN takes the easy road in pointing out shortfalls, it would be nice if they could come up with some reasonable solutions and money.
13:05 November 2, 2012 by ChrisRea
Does anyone have a link to the original report? I would not like to rely only on a journalistic perspective, especially as the UN report is apparently strongly contested by the German government on the basis of lack of scientific data. I also wonder why the disagreement was not mentioned in the article above.
22:35 November 2, 2012 by Englishted
UN knows FA sometimes .

I would also like to read the report ,well pointed out @ChrisRea
10:44 November 3, 2012 by StoutViking
Ooh, I got one...

Why not leave the violent husbands in the homeland? OH SNAP!

People are different from one another down to the process of thought and preception. What we may see as abuse, domestic violence and oppression of women - is considered a "norm" by others, even a decree.

Perhaps now they'll find budget to assemble special police forces that will deal exclusively with domestic violence of immigrants, honor killings and Female Genitail Mutilaiton?

@angelfood

Shhh, the PC Polizisten might hear you.
23:51 November 5, 2012 by soros
Protecting immigrant women from abusive husbands should first be a matter for their respective communities, not for the German ("foreign") authorities. The German police are often seen as intruders and the authority of the German justice system is not really accepted by many immigrants. Well, what's left then?

As for sending people back, it's high time the message gets out that migration is not a right. Societies have the right to determine who gets to stay and who is to be evicted, just like individuals have the right to govern their own domains. Migrants need to respect the laws of the land, not try to impose their ways of life. If they can't adapt, they ought to leave.
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