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Violence at neo-Nazi march counter-protest

The Local · 7 Oct 2012, 12:34

Published: 07 Oct 2012 12:34 GMT+02:00

Around 150 far-right extremists gathered in the small town of Göppingen in Baden-Württemberg. After word spread of the event, over 2,000 people came from all over Germany to protest it.

Police arrested 101 counter-demonstrators, most thought to be left-wing activists. Forty-five criminal offences were recorded and investigators are looking into whether a fire on the train tracks between Stuttgart and Ulm was set by people involved with the protest.

Over 1,500 police officers were present at the march, which began at 3pm, by when violence had already erupted among those who had turned up to derail it. Twenty-two of the 28 officers injured were affected by tear gas sprayed into the crowds.

Three were hit by flying stones, two sustained ear injuries from fireworks and one was sprayed with pepper spray. Three police horses also had to be treated for injuries.

Göppingen police chief Martin Fiegel claimed that some officers were deliberately targeted by protesters.

The afternoon turned ugly when a large group of people tried to break through a police blockade. When officers tried to stop them, some counter-demonstrators became violent.

Police said that while organisers had expected 400 neo-Nazis to attend, only 150 did.

Story continues below…

Göppingen authorities had previously tried to stop the neo-Nazi march from happening. The council succeeded in getting a ban put on the event, but this was lifted on Friday by a Baden-Württemberg court.

DAPD/The Local/jcw

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

16:20 October 7, 2012 by lucksi
"Twenty-two of the 28 officers injured were affected by tear gas sprayed into the crowds"

So they injured themselves. And how many protesters were hurt?
19:46 October 7, 2012 by IchBinKönig
Good to see so many rise up against anti-Semitism and Nationalist / Socialist control over the rest of the European continent. oh wait...

They are the opposite of that. They are violent socialist, anti-Semitic, ethnomasochistic xenophiles, with an EU Nationalist streak.
20:08 October 7, 2012 by tercel
"Around 150 far-right extremists gathered in the small town of Göppingen in Baden-Württemberg. After word spread of the event, over 2,000 people came from all over Germany to protest it.

Police arrested 101 counter-demonstrators, most thought to be left-wing activists. Forty-five criminal offences were recorded and investigators are looking into whether a fire on the train tracks between Stuttgart and Ulm was set by people involved with the protest.

Göppingen police chief Martin Fiegel claimed that some officers were deliberately targeted by protesters."

Left wing activists? What was meant was - far-left wing extremists. Look at the actions of the nazi brown shirts in Germany in the 1930's and the actions of these far-left wing extremists and they are IDENTICAL. "Europol (the european arm of Interpol) has shown in annual survey after annual survey that almost all of the terrorism in europe is by muslims and left-wing extremists, there is virtually no right-wing terrorism. "

Europol did NOT say there was NO right wing terrorism BUT that almost ALL of the terrorism in europe is by muslims and left-wing extremists.

One may wonder whether those on the left are so willfully blind that if their daughter will be raped before their eyes, they would totally deny this fact. The current reality is that inhumanly hard, and the kept politically correct multicultural lie is so great that in confrontation with the terrifying reality one observes self-deception, denial and escapism to make life livable. Until the bomb explodes…

"To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize." -- Voltaire
21:49 October 7, 2012 by catjones
In this case, sounds like the neo-nazis were the orderly ones.
09:02 October 8, 2012 by antopizzuto
Wow... ugly how many Neo-Nazi fans comment on the TheLocal... are you fu***ng kidding? In the country which gave birth to Nazism ANY (repeat: ANY) attempt to re-create something similar MUST be immediately opposed.

For me the nice new is: for 150 stupid idiots with paralyzed right arm, 2000 citizens were ready to break their noses.

Until the ratio is 10:1 maybe we should not have them leading this country again, in the coming decades.

PS: defining Neo-Nazi "the orderly ones" is really disgusting... read the news, please....
09:14 October 8, 2012 by ChrisRea
@ antopizzuto

Not only that the 2000 were ready to break the noses, but many of them ignited the violence, which makes them also stupid idiots, just like the neo-nazis. We should not tolerate violence in any form.
11:06 October 8, 2012 by Firmino
This crap always happen. Why don't the left wing demonstrators just stay home? I doubt the "neo nazis" would cause any trouble otherwise.
15:42 October 8, 2012 by antopizzuto
So, do you really want to have neo-nazis going around for your towns, taking advantage from the historical situation to gain votes again?

Wow... anyone seems to be so scared about "ghosty" muslim terrorists but no issue if 150 Brievik-fans are around...

Once more: they should beat them any time they try to keep their head up again...

My grandpa fought in the mountains against fascists, in WWII... in my family we have hard time to consider them as part of the "democratic forum".

I'm living in Germany since few months... but I read about 10 or 11 murders perpetrated by neo-nazis in the recent year. Are these the "innocent" guys not causing any troubles? Or the ones pepper-spraying Jews during a meeting two weeks ago?

Freedom of speech, freedom of demonstration should not be applied to whom is not recognizing these rights to other people, imho.
17:05 October 8, 2012 by Firmino
And violent left-wing demonstrators are making it better?
19:45 October 8, 2012 by ChrisRea
@ antopizzuto

You missed the point. You can protest against neo-nazis (and I think it is good to do that, I would have done that if I would have been there) without using violence. Take for example the counter-demonstrations in Berlin, when ProDeutschland wanted to get visibility. Simply by over-numbering them, the counter-demonstrators sent the message that racism is not welcomed. If you add the atmosphere they created (lively music, funny slogans etc), it is pretty clear who gained votes.

By acting violently, the extreme-left demonstrators actually helped neo-nazis to gain votes.

My grandpa fought as well against fascists. And I strongly believe that their values and principles are wrong. But equally wrong would be to physically attack them when I see them on the street just because I disapprove what they believe in. Only when they resort to violence, then it is justifiable to use violence yourself to protect the victims.
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