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Greens put factory farms onto election menu

The Local · 5 Sep 2012, 12:53

Published: 05 Sep 2012 12:53 GMT+02:00

"We Greens want to systematically make the fight against factory farming an issue in the parliamentary elections," Renate Künast, chairwoman of the Greens' parliamentary group told Wednesday’s Die Welt newspaper.

The party wants to change the law to prevent the construction of the large-scale industrial farms. Their proposal would subject farms which do not produce 50 percent of their own animal feed to stricter building provisions, and would restrict their access to government subsidies.

Regulations should exist that entitle each breed of animal enough space to move, adequate exercise and proper food, the party told Die Welt.

The party would also forbid farmers from cutting off cattle horns and chicken beaks which is generally done to stop them hurting themselves and others in factory farm conditions.

The use of antibiotics in livestock is another issue the party wants to highlight, according to the paper. Instead of having whole herds of animals treated with antibiotics as a preventative measure, the party wants only the sick animals to receive the medication.

The Greens also offer a proposal they hope will make animals suffer less during slaughter - forbidding contract workers in slaughterhouses.

The party told the paper that there was a correlation between the number of contract workers in a slaughterhouse, and the number of animals who are not killed immediately during the slaughter process. There was risk to the consumers, too, the party said, because standards of hygiene were not being followed.

Making it more difficult to operate industrial livestock farms in Germany would also help the global environment, the Greens argued.

"For its local meat production, Germany is using more and more feed from the Third World, and in doing so is taking away the land the people in those countries need to plant their own food crops," Künast told Die Welt.

Story continues below…

Leading Green politician Jürgen Trittin recently ended his honorary post as environment ambassador for Bundesliga football team Werder Bremen because the team is sponsored by the poultry producer Wiesenhof where standards have been criticised by animal rights campaigners.

The Local/mbw

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

17:08 September 5, 2012 by twisted
Personally, I think this is a great idea. I never buy chicken from the roasting stands or from supermarkets...only from people I trust to provide me with a healthy (but dead) chicken. Too much food is brought to the stores from questionable sources. Admittedly, we pay more, but at least I feel comfortable with what I eat.
17:24 September 5, 2012 by neunElf
twisted, I love you attitude, "Admittedly, we pay more, but at least I feel comfortable with what I eat. "

You cavalierly decree that we should all pay more so long as you are comfortable. How big of you. Why should you be the standard?

I prefer for people to have a choice, let the market decide.
20:43 September 5, 2012 by sonriete
The Greens are in good company, made me think of some quotes from famous men like this one;

"He who is cruel to animals becomes hard also in his dealings with men. We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals."

--Immanuel Kant"
03:02 September 7, 2012 by Hell low Kitty
Hmm..these turkeys are not from Germany, which can be identified by the colors.

They wear national colors of blue, red, white.
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