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German drops Mayan skull, endangers mankind
Will it still work, Indy? Photo: DPA

German drops Mayan skull, endangers mankind

Published: 10 May 2012 11:52 GMT+02:00
Updated: 10 May 2012 11:52 GMT+02:00

The volcanic rock skull, named Quauthemoc, was dropped - or, more eerily, may have fallen of its own accord - during a photo-shoot at a laboratory in the small town of Glauchau, Saxony.

"It was probably put down somewhere a bit wobbly," an eye-witness told Bild newspaper. "Suddenly it crashed to the floor. A big piece broke off the chin. It's really tragic."

But the skull's private owner - who was not in the room at the time of the fateful accident - was more sanguine.

"It was a bit of a shock at first, but then I found the damage was fairly marginal, so I was quite relieved," skull-owner Thomas Ritter told The Local. "I don't think it's a bad omen."

The 43-year-old amateur historian calls his Mayan skull Quauthemoc, and says it is one of 13 magic skulls that will help humanity survive the impending apocalypse on December 21, 2012 – the last day of the Mayan calendar.

On that day, Ritter plans to bring Quauthemoc to a meeting with the other owners and their skulls to an ancient Mayan site in Mexico.

"The prophecy says that the skulls will reveal a secret knowledge to humanity on that day," said Ritter. "But I can't say more than that. The skulls might start speaking or something, but I have no idea."

The journey taken by Quauthemoc to the lab in Saxony is worthy of an Indiana Jones adventure – Ritter said it had been kept in southern India and Tibet, where it was stolen from a monastery by a Nazi expedition between 1937 and 1939.

After the war, it was found among the belongings of Nazi Interior Minister and Gestapo chief Heinrich Himmler, a well-known connoisseur of black magic and ancient pagan cultures.

Ritter wrote in 2009 that a man whose grandfather was present when Himmler was arrested and took the skull, later gave it to him at meeting in Wiltshire, southern England.

The man told Ritter that Quauthemoc had chosen to “continue its journey” with him.

Ritter said he was not concerned that the chip on the skull's chin will limit its ability to prevent Armageddon.

"A lot of the other skulls have some kind of superficial damage too," he pointed out, rejecting the theory that butter-fingered lab assistants in Saxony would be responsible if the world ends in December.

The Local/bk

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

14:32 May 10, 2012 by freechoice
so when will the alien space ship departs from the mayan temple?
14:54 May 10, 2012 by zeddriver
I have news for the doomsday types. The Mayans did not have leap years. The rest of the world used and still does use the leap year. Which was started in 46 BC. That means 514 leap years have past which equals 17 months. Therefor using the Mayan calender means that dec 2012 happened in June of 2011. And we are still here.
14:57 May 10, 2012 by rmarquina
I have only one thing to say: pfff
15:05 May 10, 2012 by XFYRCHIEF
The real damage here is that this artifact was stolen from Tibet by the Nazis, but was not returned to its rightful owners. It has just become another privately owned curiosity.
15:13 May 10, 2012 by lordkorner
The real damage here is that this stupid article was ever written,edited and printed, I really can't wait until 2013 and an end to this drivel.
15:28 May 10, 2012 by DOZ
If it is Mayan then it belongs back where it came from. In other words, the NAZI's were not the 1st to steal it. Return all artifacts back to Central and South America and quit raping their Antiquities.
15:50 May 10, 2012 by souzadias
Am I the only one still wondering how a Mayan skull ends up in Tibet?!
19:46 May 10, 2012 by Aschaffenburgboy
I like this article, it is nice to see new material on the local and I think they are trying to cater to every taste.

@souzadias, I was wondering the same thing.
20:42 May 10, 2012 by Harry the Horrible
Here is a little secret:

Mayans didn't know about the .23 in 365.23 days to orbit the sun. They didn't have leap years.

Mayan "2012" ended in July 2011.
01:46 May 11, 2012 by jeff10renatus
Questions & Comments:

Ah, okay, so, it's definite - one should take short positions on everything? Sell, sell, selll.

On the other hand, where are the other 12 skulls?

It seems that just one skull can't save us, so, with or without the breakage, we were doomed anyway.

And, as noted by others, how in the heck did the Tibetans steal from the Mayans the skull? Did the Tibetans beat Columbus to the new world. Not that the new world was new to the Mayans; it was new only to those not from what is now sometimes referred to as Latin America.

But nevertheless, this is convenient - the end of the world can be blamed on the nazis.
20:16 May 12, 2012 by BorninDachau
I have my own apocalypse survival items, a 30.06 and a 12 gauge shotgun.
07:12 May 13, 2012 by ineuw
There are numerous reasons why the Mayans predicted the end of the world. They are . . . the Mayan empire declined, the Spanish destroyed much of their remaining culture, their mystical skulls were stolen and stored in other parts of the globe, a failed German chicken farmer stole one of them from India, another German named the skull after Quauthemoc who was Aztec, and then the third German dropped it. If these are not valid reasons, then I don't know what are.
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