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Man who shot prosecutor only faced mild sentence

The Local · 12 Jan 2012, 09:59

Published: 12 Jan 2012 09:59 GMT+01:00

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The 54-year-old, named only as Rudolf U., was set to receive a suspended sentence for fraud and not paying wage-related social security, but is now expected to be charged with murder for the attack in Dachau's civil court.

Judge Lukas Neubeck was reading out his verdict, which included a one-year suspended sentence, when Rudolf U. pulled out a pistol and fired at him, the Süddeutsche Zeitung reported on Thursday.

The judge ducked out of the way of the shot, and Rudolf U. then turned his weapon on the 31-year-old prosecutor, hitting him three times, once in the shoulder, in the arm and the stomach.

Desperate attempts to save the prosecutor, named in the German press as Tilman T., failed and he died in hospital. He is said to have studied in New York and to have been married to an American woman who moved to Germany to be with him.

Two customs officers who had been called as witnesses in the case overpowered Rudolf U. and held him until police officers arrested him, confiscating a French 6.35-millimetre calibre pistol, the paper said.

Speaking on Wednesday evening, just hours after the attack, public prosecutor Kristina Karbach said it seemed Rudolf U. had got the gun illegally. She said she would apply for a detention order for the man on suspicion of murder.

There were no security checks on Rudolf U. when he entered the court, despite what one witness said was the transport firm owner's previously aggressive behaviour.

“I knew something would happen,” the court official told the Süddeutsche Zeitung. “He had already been acting up in the hearings and was totally refusing to comply. He even had a go at his own lawyer.”

Security checks were not normal at the court, as no serious crimes are tried there, the paper said.

The generally sedate atmosphere there was turned into one of panic when Rudolf U. started firing his gun. As witnesses waiting to give evidence fled from the scene, they were joined by a number of people from the neighbouring courtroom, seen running from the building.

One shocked court assistant said he thought the gunshots heralded a massacre, and described how he ran to a nearby toilet and locked himself in.

Just a few minutes later, as Rudolf U. was being held by witnesses, armed police wearing bullet-proof vests stormed into the room and arrested him.

The Bavarian association of judges called on Wednesday night for security measures in courts to be increased.

While Bavaria's state justice minister Beate Merk said she had great sympathy for the victim and his family, she said, “absolute security cannot be achieved,” and warned against making courts into fortresses.

The Local/DAPD/hc

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

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Your comments about this article

19:05 January 11, 2012 by Beachrider
Don't you people screen people before allowing them in a courthouse? I'll bet that you will start, now!
21:10 January 11, 2012 by Joshontour
How does anyone get a gun into a courthouse?
21:35 January 11, 2012 by Alofat
No civil courts don't screen people. And no they probably won't start now either.
05:48 January 12, 2012 by abu gerhard
Hmmm, let¦#39;s see how this works. The accused gets a slick attorney who appeals to all the bleeding heart liberals in Germany (and there are many) and pleads the usual line of garbage: Abused and disadvantaged childhood, not loved by father and mother, emotionally unstable because schoolmates called him a fag, father a drunkard, mother a successful prostitute and whatever other excuses and lies listed in the attorney handbook of ¦quot;How to Bullshit Juries in One Easy Lesson.¦quot;

Folks, this is a classic case of first degree murder. There is clear evidence, sufficient witnesses and justification to execute this guy in 30 days or less without all the needless costs associated with a prolonged trial and all the publicity, fanfare and demonstrations by pro-life groups like the fanatical American ACLU.

The money it takes to support him in prison for the usual 15 years before he is ¦quot;officially declared rehabilitated¦quot; and released would be better spent on Harz IV.

I can¦#39;t for the life of me understand why the EU doesn¦#39;t have the death penalty!! There are far too many cases like this where the evidence is elf und neunzig Prozent.
06:58 January 12, 2012 by insight101
Because the safe moral position for Germans is: "You don't have the right to take a life." Unless of course you do it through smoking in someone's face or abortion. But those things don't kill criminals...
12:05 January 12, 2012 by oneforall
@abu gerhard, @insight101

Really guys?
13:15 January 12, 2012 by iseedaftpeople
what an idiot.

Pop quiz - what gives you a better chance of putting your life back together and moving on?

a) a suspended sentence for (social security) fraud,

or b) 15-plus years in the slammer for murder...
13:34 January 12, 2012 by William Thirteen
apparently Rudolf U. has the equivalent capacity for reason as many of the commenters on this thread...
13:47 January 12, 2012 by moccasynth
abu gerhard. internet troll extraordinaire.

or an absolute clown who should have a breathalyzer installed on his laptop.
13:55 January 12, 2012 by freechoice
Why he pulled out the gun? Rudolf U couldn't comprehend the significance of a suspended sentence? On the side note, how can he missed the judge when his bullets hit every part of the prosecutor?
17:24 January 12, 2012 by Ruhetag
This place is becoming more and more like the USA. :-(

I thought I left all that crap behind me.
11:24 January 13, 2012 by dbert4
@Ruhetag - Must be the "positive effect" of American media.
16:50 January 13, 2012 by raandy
Ruhetag, It's all one type of crap or another, here or there.

Most people bring with them what they are trying to leave behind.
09:35 January 16, 2012 by mrk1959
How much does a security system cost? How much is a human life worth? Please make a change before this happens again. An ounce of prevention............, you know the rest.
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