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Antibiotics for poultry widespread in NRW

The Local · 15 Nov 2011, 17:00

Published: 15 Nov 2011 17:00 GMT+01:00

Johannes Remmel, North Rhine-Westphalia’s consumer protection expert said the results of a study he commissioned – the first of its kind in Germany – show 96 percent of the more than 10 million birds in the state had been treated with antibiotics.

“The results have caused me a lasting nausea,” he said, explaining that the numbers vastly exceed previous estimates and were likely similar nationwide. He said government should put in place stricter regulations of the practice in order to protect consumers.

The German Farmers’ Association and the German Poultry Association, both of which represent poultry producers, have launched an initiative to reduce antibiotic use in chickens by 30 percent in the next five years.

However, the groups added in a statement, poultry currently remains “safe to eat.”

According to German law, antibiotics are only supposed to be given to sick animals and officials have promised in the past to control their use more carefully.

But although their use in pigs and cattle has been tracked since the beginning of the year, chickens are not included in the central database.

Remmel said industry leaders have long led consumers to believe that antibiotic use in animals was an exception.

“Now we have it in black and white,” he said. “Use of antibiotics is the rule.”

The intake of excessive amounts of antibiotics can lead to drug resistance, making it impossible to treat serious disease, Remmel said.

Story continues below…

According to the Robert Koch Institute, more than 15,000 people die in Germany each year due to drug-resistant bacterial infections such as the hospital bug MRSA.

The Local/DPA/mdm

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

19:22 November 15, 2011 by Navigator_B
"According to German law, antibiotics are only supposed to be given to sick animals".

But nearly all of the animals ARE sick from being crammed together (with other sick animals) into tiny spaces and being fattened up for the sole purpose of increasing their weight as fast as possible, so I guess that these factory farmers are not breaking German law.
19:37 November 15, 2011 by Staticjumper
"The results have caused me a lasting nausea,"? Really?! Let me guess ... vaccines cause autism, WiFi causes nervous disorders and living near power lines causes cancer. It's interesting that the article doesn't mention that Mr. Remmel is a member of the hyperactivist Greens Party.
22:51 November 15, 2011 by jbaker
If you lived in a bedroom that was 10x15 feet with 25-30 other humans-walking in your own feces and eating the food thrown into the muck, you would need a mountain of Pharmaceutical garbage to stay alive too. It is all about how much money these businesses can make. They don't care about your health or anyone else. The more antibiotics that are put into our food supply the less resistance we will have to fight off diseases. The Pharmaceutical Companies can then make more antibiotics to give to us that will make us more sick.

Humanity was better off before modern day medicine and the drugs that are now making us more sick then ever.

Healthy,Organic - non GMO veggies,fruits,grains and meat will keep you alive.
14:45 November 16, 2011 by SchwabHallRocks
One of my favorite University of Chicago MBA case studies was on the use of antibiotics in chickens (they grow 60% quicker)with antibiotics.

To be sure, the chickens are also constantly sick from the living conditions.

But if Germans need to be told that the antibiotics are for health reasons, because they need to feel sanctimonious, then tell them. It's just not "forthcoming."

Bottom line - in an international market the antibiotics allows farmers to produce chickens less expensively (besides they need to do this to be competitive).

Well, at least the Germans do not inject hormones in their cows... (Sure, they don't. ROTFLMAO - Rolling on the floor laughing my a off.)
16:15 November 16, 2011 by Staticjumper
Does anyone have a source that supports the assertion that antibiotics used in poultry production are passed on to humans? I can only seem to find studies that prove they are NOT passed on, i.e.

http://ps.fass.org/content/82/4/618.full.pdf
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