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Kaiser heir weds princess in Potsdam
Photo: DPA

Kaiser heir weds princess in Potsdam

Published: 27 Aug 2011 15:02 GMT+02:00

The guests included nobility from around the world, as well as famous individuals from society and politics.

The bride wore a dress dubbed “whisper white" designed by Wolfgang Joop and a tiara that was reportedly made in Paris in 1860. She arrived at the wedding in a Rolls Royce, while her 35-year-old husband walked to the ceremony.

Although the pair is not in line for the throne, Prince Georg Friedrich would be kaiser had his great-great grandfather not been forced to abdicate in the wake of World War I.

The pair are considered reserved and down to earth and Germany’s "royal" couple leads a relatively bourgeois existence: both are business managers and work at companies in Berlin and Rostock.

DAPD/The Local/mw

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

Your comments about this article

16:14 August 27, 2011 by Klaipeda
Its nice to see for once a German magazine honoring its country's past rather than spitting on it.
16:28 August 27, 2011 by Sastry.M
Let his nobility be blessed dedicated to his countrymen who have risen like Phoenix from ruins of destitution and horror left by defeat in ww-2 and constantly reminded with hate in spite of huge compensations to the aggrieved with their hard earned money bearing toil and tears.

"Virtus sola Nobilitat"-- Virtue only ennobles flooding with tears of penitence all self pitied misery perpetuated with hateful vengeance..
17:15 August 27, 2011 by Eric Best
Well said, Klaipeda and Sastry.M.

Too many people lazily presume they are better than those who preceded them, attributing their failures to some kind of moral lack. It is true that the imperial German constitution proved inadequate for the social changes that followed the nation's establishment. Institutions and values that worked in an agrarian society were unable to handle the growing complexities of an industrial state. But in this Germany was not unique. Germany at the time must be judged against its neighbours and it was no more militarised that France or Russia and it was more tolerant of its Jewish citizens. I think it is reasonable to speculate that if Germany kept its royal institutions after it democratised at the end of WW1, there might not have been the vacuum created for Hitler to occupy (but we'll never know!).

Coming to the present, modern monarchies, overall, are the most stable, free and democratic states on the planet, with the monarch's role to represent the traditions and aspirations of their state as a culture, above the transitory conflicts of politics.
17:26 August 27, 2011 by catjones
Eric Best...Please. Monarchies add the same value as a hood ornament. You should pick up a history book and read about the lives of past aristocracies vs their commoners. Hardly a past worth glorifying.
20:55 August 27, 2011 by lordkorner
Der Kaiser is Wed, long live Der Kaiser...
08:37 August 28, 2011 by Eric Best
Perhaps, catjones you haven't thought about this too deeply. Human (and animal) life is orientated around a symbolic or iconic 'centre'. For animals, this centre can be a territory or, perhaps, a dominant male. For humans, this can range from a tribal totem pole to the CEO of a business. 'Home' is a place where we feel centred and strong. In the way humans organise themselves politically, every country has a head of state and a capitol city, which serve as centres. In war, when these fall, the state falls (we frequently ignore how much of our lives are organised and lived out symbolically).

The power of this need for a centre is demonstrated by the urgency placed on replacing the CEO, Pope, king, etc when one retires or dies. It can also be observed politically in, say, Belgium, where it probably only the institution of the monarchy there that acts as a centripetal force keeping the Flemish and Walloons together.

Where the head of state is involved in the daily politics of a country (as in the USA France or Libya), it is wise to hold regular ballots to see if that individual still embodies the centre by representing the collective will of the people. Hence we (ideally) elect presidents. Where the centre represents the culture and institutions but without partisan political power, a monarchic system appears to work best. Where, as in Germany, you have a head of state without either political clout or the sense of permanence or gravitas to represent the continuity of the institutions of state as a collective endeavour and aspiration, the centre gets lost in the politics, which is about as inspirational as block of soviet era flats. This truly has the same value as a hood ornament!

The presence of royalty is one advantage Germany's neighbours (UK, Netherlands, Denmark, etc), will continue to have over Germany.
10:55 August 28, 2011 by Celeon
Georg Friedrich.... who? Lets be honest, the guests surely knew who he is but in the country nobody would have taken notice of this wedding without the media reporting about it.

Nearly nobody would recognize their faces on the street. It was propably a surprise for most in the country to hear that the Kaiser has still living decendants AT ALL.

There is a lot of former royality in Germany but most of them are rather emberassing idiots like the "Prügelprinz" Ernst August of Hannover who is, by the way, also a prince of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. And believe me, nobody even wants to hear that in UK either. :-D
12:12 August 28, 2011 by PawD
It is a real shame that in todays world where we look down upon dictatorship and where the people's opinion is held to be the most important relics of the royalty are still being honoured... so let us jointly say... 'f**k the Kaiser'
14:14 August 28, 2011 by Eric Best
Celeon, those royals whose role is enshrined in their country's constitution by and large have a real sense of duty to their people. In Germany, (ex) nobility may have the priveleges of inherited wealth and name but have no calling or responsibility. This is not a good recipe for character development.

But its great to see at least one couple (and there are many others) who do aspire to retain some of what is best in their tradition.

PawD, much opinion is unformed, narcissistic, and cruel. Truth, beauty and justice are much more important. These are not democratic givens but won and defended through discipline, creativity and integrity, frequently against the tyranny of mass opinion. Royal institutions function at their best as public reminders and promotors of this truth.
14:32 August 28, 2011 by Joshen
It's a good thing that the royals with their superior bloodlines are here to teach the inferior masses about truth, justice and beauty and to lead us through hard times. Just imagine the world if we would consider all people as equals! :o
02:26 August 29, 2011 by Eric Best
Joshen, it is you who say these people possess 'superior bloodlines'. I doubt if you ask the individuals in question they would see things in those terms. Resentments and prejudices are best owned than projected.
11:02 August 29, 2011 by ironrat
I think he's handsome and shes pretty. Who cares who or what they are...Good Luck to both of them.
11:07 August 29, 2011 by ErickDDiaz
Im loyal to Burger King. Hey I have an idea, what if McDonalds Marrys Burger King.
13:55 August 29, 2011 by Joshen
@ Eric Best

No I don't really believe that most royals do see things in that way. I'm critical of the system, not the person. If you endorse that the position of Head of state is decided trough blood and not suitability then I figure you should agree, at least partially, that the blood actually makes a difference.

I reject the whole idea of "superior bloodliines" and see succession to the throne as a historical phenomenon of keeping power within the royal family. These fuedal traditions have in my opinion no place in a democratic society.
18:53 August 29, 2011 by Jack Kerouac
What do you mean nobody knew they existed? Of course they did - and I did as well. It's too bad Prussia doesn't exist anymore, since it is the German nobility's historic homeland and was once the nation's most powerful territory. I'm happy for them, God bless!
05:20 September 3, 2011 by Eric Best
Comment: Well argued, Joshen. However, I have not reached the same conclusions. Here's why, FWIW: How do we explain the phenomenon that so many of Germany's impeccably democratic neighbours retain hereditary heads of state?

Unlike the role of managing a country, the role of head of state is not a meritocracy. In Australia, where I live, our "head of state", the Governor General (who represents the Queen and is selected by our Prime Minister), must be a person of integrity and good standing, and certainly bad behaviour can cause disqualification. But s/he will not be "Australian of the Year" nor is s/he elected. The reasons for being offered the job can be varied but the individual needs simply be respected and competent at managing his / her duties. It is also true that a decency / competency requirement is placed on monarchs - they are expected to fill the shoes or lose credibility. If critical, they get replaced (e.g. King Edward VIII).

So the role of symbolic head of state is somewhat different from actual national management, where its really critical to have the best available person for the job and for us to have a say in who we think that might be (ergo, democracy).

So, why "bloodlines"? Certainly not because of inherent superiority. Dynastic succession appears to work on a symbolic level because it symbolises continuity and tradition - the existence of institutions, such as the legal system and a national identity over and above the changing world of politics. We may give our lives for our country, but would we give our lives for our treasurer? National identity and institutions are to 'climate' as politicians and policies are to 'the weather'. Not so much differences in the object but differences in the view. A hereditary system recognises that the national identity and its institutions - the collective project - cannot be simply subsumed into our daily politics.

This is why there is little numinosity in republics where the presidency is purely ceremonial and unelected. Such figures are 'neutered'. The have the potency of neither a monarch nor an elected president with political power to be a 'centre' for the collective. But because of the dangers, it is better that the 'centre' be separate from the politics. Hence my like of modern, democratic, constitutional monarchies.
09:54 September 6, 2011 by ECSNatale
There are many things within the German tradition to be proud of and to celebrate. If only there were more bringing together and less pulling apart, our for would be a better place.
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